Tag: active addiction

What’s The Best Heroin Rehab Near Me?

Is There A Good Heroin Rehab Near Me

It’s not something I thought I would ever have to type into the google search in my computer, but I did. What’s the best heroin rehab near me. I have been sober for over 6 years and never tried heroin. So how did a guy like me end up on the business end of a search for heroin rehab near me? I was hanging out with the wrong girl. Tiffany Powers was her name and no that’s not her real name. Anonymity people!

It Was Clear A Heroin Detox Was Needed As well.

Heroin Rehab Near Me

Tiffany and I were buds, I wanted to date her, but that friend zone seemed to exist even though I just googled heroin rehab near me, for her. You’d think after an intimate search like that love would be in the air. We were hanging out and I knew something was up. She seemed to fall asleep very quickly and was always in the bathroom for long periods of time. When I finally confronted her she said, “I’m a heroin addict, I need you to find a heroin rehab near me.” I was scared. I knew I had to act quick based on another article I wrote about what to do if some one you know needs help with addiction. I typed in heroin rehab near me when I realized, detox must come first.

Going to a Heroin Rehab Near Me Effective Without Detox?

I knew from previous experience with friends that detox from heroin was horribly painful and that I needed to find a heroin rehab near me that had a medical detox program or a heroin rehab near me that partnered with a medical detox. Unfortunately, in Broome County, NY there were no medical heroin detox facilities at the time. Not having a rehab that offered heroin detox using medication was a huge problem because I knew that many heroin addicts will leave treatment and use heroin again if they don’t have a medical heroin detox.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

Tiffany’s Heroin Recovery Would Happen In Florida

It turned out that there was no heroin rehab near me and no heroin detox available for my friend. So I reached out to the place that I knew would help, Light House Recovery Institute. They got Tiffany on a plane that same day and into a heroin detox and into their recovery for heroin program. So, it turned out there actually wasn’t a rehab near me, but the good news is that with just one phone call I got her the help she needed and today things are going just great. Heroin rehab near me is something I hope no one has to ever search for. But today with technology and transportation the whole world has opened up and the help that heroin addicts need can be accessed anytime from anywhere.

Mixing Alcohol and Vicodin is a Big Deal

Alcohol and Vicodin LighthouseMixing Prescription Drugs with Alcohol is Like Playing Russian Roulette

Alcohol and Vicodin can be a deadly combination. There are a handful of prescription drugs that people regularly take with alcohol. Vicodin and alcohol mixing is common, as is Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, Adderal, and many, many others. People often take these medicines and have no idea how harmful it truly is, and that it could even lead to sudden death. Here we’re going to focus primarily on Vicodin and the dangers of mixing it with alcohol.

Most people don’t know exactly why and how combining drugs can become toxic in a person’s body even in small doses. As far as alcohol and Vicodin go, this is what happens.

The Effects of Alcohol and Vicodin on Your Body

Separately, painkillers and alcohol have very different effects. They are different chemicals that have different purposes when introduced into the body. When combined, the chemicals can interact and cause a toxic combination that overwhelms a person’s system before your body can eliminate the toxins. Think of it as your body working on overtime and it just can’t keep up.

Excessive hydrocodone in Vicodin can cause memory loss, confusion, and breathing issues, many of the same things that excessive alcohol causes. Besides acute medical emergencies like cardiac and breathing problems, combining the two drugs can have an enormously negative impact on a person’s liver.

Mixing Drugs Is Not About How Much But How Your Body Tolerates It

Taking alcohol and Vicodin together can suppress the system so much so that a person’s breathing can stop completely. The FDA advises that people who are prescribed Vicodin should not drink any alcohol at all. Every person has a different body chemistry and will have a different reaction to any foreign substance that they put in their body.

You can have two people who weigh the same and have a similar body composure. One will be able to tolerate the mixture, and the second person might slip into a coma and die from the same amount. It’s a game of Russian Roulette that no one should ever play because it just isn’t worth it.

If you have consumed alcohol and Vicodin, some warning signs of overdose include:alcohol and vicodin

  • Excessive tiredness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Slow or weak pulse
  • Lack of coordination and control
  • Falling out of consciousness
  • Disorientation.

If anyone you know exhibits these kind of symptoms after ingesting a substance, get medical help for them immediately.

It is always better to err on the side of caution when combining drugs and alcohol. If you aren’t sure, don’t do it. And by all means, if there is a warning label against drinking alcohol, stay away! Drug combinations cause so many useless deaths per year. A little vigilance could save a lot of lives.

 

Destroyed By Addiction. Saved By A Delray Beach Rehab.

Going to a Delray Beach Rehab Saved My Ldelray beach rehab lighthouseife

Eight months ago, I was homeless, unemployed, and soulless, all because I was completely and totally dependent on heroin. I know I definitely had zero intention of going to a Delray Beach Rehab. I literally slept under bridges and on park benches. I was a shell of the person I used to be, nodding out from too much heroin when I managed to score some, or running around the worst parts of town like a zombie in need of blood from The Walking Dead when I was looking for more of my drug. It was my lifeline. I was so in over my head that everyone had given up on me because the pain of watching me go downhill was too much for them. They knew there was nothing left they could do.

My Darkest Days As A Heroin Addict

I didn’t think about going to rehab. I didn’t care to. My life was what was right in front of me: the endless pursuit of my next hit. I didn’t give a damn about anything else. It’s hard to put into words what that kind of life is like. You are no longer a part of society, it’s almost as if you are one of the feral cats roaming the streets. Not a cute kitten, but one that looks like it has been in daily fights for years and most likely has rabies. That was me.

heroin addiction lighthouse recoveryI was living this way for a little over a year. How I survived I’ll never know. I got picked up by the cops one spring morning as I was hanging out with my dope dealer, up to no good in a seedy hotel room. I would have once through that room was disgusting, but in my current state at the time it was a luxury. The cops stormed in, it wasn’t the first time I had a gun pointed at my face, and I was taken away in handcuffs.

My sentence included rehab. I thought it was a joke, but I agreed to go so that some of my legal problems would go away. Off I went to a South Florida, with my destination being a Delray Beach rehab center.

My First Week at The Delray Beach Rehab

When I got to admissions, I was 105 pounds, which was entirely too little for my 5’5, naturally curvy frame. They drug tested me, asked me a million questions, and the detox process started. The next few days were horrible, hot, painful, stomach churning, sad, horrifying, and shameful. It took about 5 full days for me to feel somewhat human and to begin participating in groups, meeting with my therapist, and eating substantial meals.

When I was with it enough to speak with my therapist one on one, we actually called my parents and brother, who knew where I was but had been so estranged that we hadn’t talked to or seen each other in nearly a year. We all cried. They agreed to come in and visit me over the course of my stay.

By the end of my first week at rehab, I had come to enough to realize the severity of how I had been living my life and wished I could go back to being the cheerleading, tennis playing, peppy teenage girl I had lighthouse delray beach rehabonce been. However, I couldn’t dwell in the past if I wanted to move forward, so ahead I looked.

Learning About Myself at The Delray Recovery Center

In the rest of my time at treatment, I had the opportunity to learn more about myself than I ever knew I could. I learned the how’s and why’s of my addiction and I realized that I can actually change if I want to. Knowing that was hugely empowering, because once you break away from the addiction, you have the power to get your life back.

Sober Living in Delray

I left rehab after 60 days and continued my treatment by living in sober living in Delray beach while attending an intensive outpatient program. I did the work, and it was tough. I wanted to kill people some days, and I certainly wanted to get high. But my newfound connection with a higher power and myself helped me to stay sober, minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day.

Scars of My PaDelray Beach Rehabst and Hope for My Future

I still have scars of my addiction. I have legal problems that are still waiting to be resolved, I contracted Hepatitis C while using needles, I’m still repairing relationships with my family, and I still struggle with my addiction daily. But I’m eight months sober on the day I’m writing this, and I never thought that would be possible.

If someone as low in their life as I was can do it, anyone can. No matter who you are, what your circumstances are, or how low you have gone, there is hope, and you can have your life back.

 

Why I Went to Alcohol Rehab In Florida

Alcohol Rehab in Florida Was My Best Move

Alcohol Rehab in FloridaIn 2013 I made the decision to go to alcohol rehab in Florida. It wasn’t overnight, and it definitely wasn’t easy. It took a few rounds of detox in my home state of Ohio and a lot of coaxing and begging from friends and family to finally get me to agree to go. In the end, I’m grateful I did. I think that decision ultimately saved my life.

Alcohol Addiction Was A Slow Progression

My love affair with alcohol didn’t start out too bad, in fact, I never even saw the threat of alcoholism coming until it was way too late. I enjoyed beers in college and the occasional shot, and that fondness carried into my 20s, translating into happy hours and engagement parties. Sure, I would black out on occasion and be embarrassed about my actions, but didn’t that happen to everyone?

Maybe those moments happened to everyone, but while they were getting fewer and further between for my friends who were settling down, they were becoming more and more frequent for me. Not remembering my weekend nights was normal, and the struggle of getting up and making it through the day on saturday and sunday was only helped by the promise of more drinks at brunch, lunch, or dinner.

A Functioning Alcoholic

alcohol rehab south florida lighthouseFor a number of years, I functioned this way. I was, for all intents and purposes, a functioning alcoholic. I was able to get to work, albeit I was often hung over or even still drunk from my shenanigans the evening before. I was always a good employee – on time, hard working, although I often called in sick because of crippling hangovers. Well, my bubble was burst one Friday morning when I walked into my office and was greeted by the serious faces of my boss and the COO.

As they told me I was being let go, my already turning stomach got even worse and as I walked out of the office with my few belongings I stopped at the bar I normally went to on the way home and proceeded to drink so much that a friend had to come scrape me off the bar and bring me home.

And Then I Ended Up In Alcohol Rehab In South Florida

The next few months were a complete blur. I was probably drunk 95% of the time. Drunk was a way of life. I was tossed into the emergency room a couple of times after passing out in front of friends and finally agreed to go to detox. Well, five days in a detox center didn’t smack enough sense into me – by the second day after I left, I was back to drinking.

About two weeks passed when finally friends and family convinced me I needed major help. I had a moment of clarity and agreed to go to alcohol rehab in florida. I was very hesitant at the idea of being away from my regular life for 42 days, but what had become of my so-called regular life? Who was I? What was I doing?

After my stint in rehab in Florida, I returned to Ohio a new person. I learned so much while I was there and was able to hit a refresh button on my life. I recognized patterns of why I was drinking and realized that I’m just wired differently from other people. I am an alcoholic and will always be one.

I am grateful for each passing day that I’m sober, and I hope that I can give some inspiration to others who may be on a similar path.  

 

The Perks of Living a Sober Life

Living a Sober LifeA Sober Life Is Better

It’s hard to imagine a life without booze, drugs, and all the other substances and things that people end up in rehab for. As a matter of fact, one of the biggest gripes and hesitations of people in rehab is not understanding how they can continue to have fun and have a “life” once these things are gone from our lives. It definitely takes some time, but living a sober life is just as pleasurable – actually more so – than living high or drunk.

One of the worst parts of being a slave to a substance is the lack of control. Once you get your hands on your drug of choice of your drink, the substance is now driving, and is going to determine your actions for the duration of your “run” or bender. How many times have you promised yourself you would control it, but you can never seem to do that? This is because the substance is in control.

Changing Your Habits For Sobriety

Now picture being able to do the same things – go to a concert, the beach, or hang at home, and have an idea of the outcome of your evening. You are now in control, your new sober life allows you that luxury. It certainly takes a while to break the chains of addiction, but with the right program, a little bit of faith, and hard work you will miss your drug or drink less and less each day.

A sober life gives you so many new luxuries, including but not limited to more money, more stability, fewer issues with the law, accountability to your friends, family, and work, pride, less shame, dignity, love, hope, and joy. A life with drugs and alcohol is a life of fear, and a sober life eliminates that. It allows you the chance to have a bright future.Sober Life Lighthouse Recovery

There are a lot of factors that come into play that can help you achieve long-term and healthy sobriety. First of all, it is always important to get into a program that is right for you and allows you time to hit the “reset” button, focus on yourself, and recognize the patterns and problems that are causing you to keep drinking or using. This could range from in-patient rehab to therapy although rehab is strongly suggested because it takes you completely out of your element and many people find that taking this time to focus on yourself is a huge and necessary step to getting on the right path.

Always remember that all we have is today, so staying sober in the moment is all that really matters. This idea stems from the fact that many people feel overwhelmed at the idea of never having a drug or a drink again for their whole lives. That thought can be a lot to think about, so instead it is better to focus on each moment, and be happy for the present and each moment you have sober.

 

Addiction Relapse After Long Sobriety

Addiction Relapse LighthouseLength of Sobriety Does Not Prevent Addiction Relapse

Addiction relapse is a part of recovery, and it doesn’t matter if you have one day sober or 30 years. In a recent interview with WNYC, popular actor Jeff Daniels, known for his roles in Dumb and Dumber and The Martian, opened up about his relapse after years of sobriety and is shedding light on an issue few people understand.

Addiction Relapse Can Happen To Anyone, Anytime

If you have been to Alcoholics or Narcotics Anonymous meetings, you have heard the phrase “Just For Today”. What that means is that just for this day we will focus on our sobriety, we will focus on staying away from our drug of choice, we will focus on our higher power and putting our best foot forward. Because, in truth, today is all we have.

An addict or alcoholic who has ten sober years is just as close to a person with one day in the sense that they both canrelapse and recovery lighthouse reach for a drink or drug at any given moment. That is why stringing together days and living in the present is the most we can do to maintain our sobriety. Looking too far in the future will be overwhelming, and celebrating lengthy sobriety to the extreme may cause our guard to go down and the walls to come crashing down.

How Common is Relapse?

In recovery, relapse happens left and right. In the first year of recovery, more than half of people will relapse. The number become more promising after that – with 66% maintaining sobriety after they hit the year mark, and it jumps to 86% after 5 or more years. That being said, relapse is circumstantial and personal, and nothing concrete can predict or prevent relapse, besides having a strong support system and the desire to stay sober.

Addiction relapse can be heartbreaking for friends and family to watch. It’s the last thing we want for those close to us, especially after seeing how far they have come. It is important to support the person and do what you can to encourage them to get help, ideally before the relapse occurs.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

How to Handle a Relapse

If you have relapsed, the important thing is not to get into a huge downward spiral because of it. This is a time to learn from your mistakes, gather yourself up, and move forward. First of all, remove yourself from any situation or people that contributed to your relapse. Make sure to get rid of any alcohol or drug paraphernalia you might have laying around, and if needed, seek a medical detox center to help you recover back into being clean.

If a loved one has relapsed, encourage them to get help before the situation escalated. As heartbreaking as it may be, try not to be terribly outwardly angry with them, because chances are they are feeling very low, and this kind of “attack” may make them use or drink even more.

We only have today. So, let go of your mistakes from yesterday, and forget about tomorrow. Focus on being sober, happy, and positive – just for today.

Drug Addiction Is a Family Disease

Drug Addiction Impacts the Entire Family

There’s no way around the fact that drug addiction is a family disease. When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, it affects more than just the addict alone. It’s often that people hear about what addiction does to the person abusing drugs or alcohol, such as how it affects their body, mind, and life. But how often does anyone really hear about just how much drug addiction impacts the people that are closest to that person?

Addiction is a family disease because it deeply affects all of the people closest to the person with the addiction. For this reason, it is incredibly important for parents, spouses, children, and anyone else who is close to get help and counseling for the addiction, and to be a part of the addict’s recovery treatment.

Understanding Drug Addiction as a Family Disease

Treating drug addiction as the family disease that it is plays a critical role in the recovery of the individual who is addicted to drugs and/or alcohol. When an individual goes into treatment for drug addiction, they should be able to work on each of the underlying issues that pushed them to initially abuse drugs and alcohol in the first place.

Part of working on the underlying issues of addiction involves taking a look at the family. Did any trauma occur? Is there any tension between the family? How has addiction impacted the family and altered the family dynamic? These are the types of questions that will be discussed with the individual who is receiving treatment as well as the family during family sessions.

Family sessions are offered by the best drug rehab centers. Individuals receiving treatment for drug addiction are typically encouraged to share with their family about their treatment and invite them to a family session where they can work together on any underlying problems that may exist with a team of addiction professionals. Family members are also encouraged to be part of the recovery process and support their loved one – but not enable them.

Getting Involved in Your Loved One’s Addiction Treatment

Most rehabilitation facilities like Lighthouse offer these family programs. These programs are designed to help families cope with the trauma that comes along with addiction. We always encourage family members to be a part of the addicts drug addiction treatment. It is strongly recommended that the family participate on family days in-person or via skype if a personal visit isn’t possible and that they seek their own support system through programs like Al Anon or through a family psychologist.

It is important to be involved in your loved-one’s treatment so that you can keep tabs on their progress and know what issues are coming up while they are in rehab. You will have the opportunity to speak to their counselor individually and as a group with the patient. As difficult as it may be, it is important to listen to what is going on, be patient, and always be supportive of the addict’s progress.

Seeking Your Own Support

You will need to realize that you have a long path of healing and repair in front of you, so use the time that the addict is in treatment as a time to focus on you. Al Anon and Nar Anon meetings are a great way for loved ones of alcoholics and addicts to get support. These programs are similar to Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous meetings except that they cater strictly to the people dealing with loved ones who are alcoholics and addicts.

This may even be a great time for you to begin visiting a therapist as well. They will be able to give you tools to cope with any trauma from the past and anxiety for the future. Remember, the stronger you can make yourself, the stronger you can be for the addict, but you always need to take care of you.

Addiction is a Family Disease But Recovery Can Bring Families Together

When recovery is tackled as a team, it can bring families closer together than they ever were prior to addiction.

While no one wants to go through addiction and everything that goes along with it, if there is any silver lining its that with the right support, intervention, and a caring professional team, families can all walk away from treatment knowing much more about one another, and most importantly how they can all help each other live the best drug and alcohol free lives they can.

Do you have a loved one in need of treatment for drug addiction or alcoholism? Now is the time to advocate for your loved one and get them the help they need to recovery. Call Lighthouse today at 1-866-308-2090.

 

5 Reasons Drug Rehab is Right For You

Is It Time to Go to Drug Rehab?

Making the decision to receive treatment at a drug rehab center can be tough and scary. The reality is that it’s ultimately a decision that people put off for too long- often until it is too late.

Are you on the fence about getting help for addiction today? Maybe your loved ones have suggested it and you are thinking about it yourself. Here are five reasons that it is time to take the step and change your life today.

Signs That Drug Rehab is Right For You

  1. You have tried numerous times to “control” your drug use and failed.

    From “I’ll only drink one beer an hour” to “I’ll only dabble in (insert drug of choice here) on the weekends,” addicts make these promises to themselves as a way to feel like they are in “control” of the situation when the reality is that they have lost control and are powerless to stop using their drug of choice.The truth is that these attempts to stop may work for a night, maybe even for weeks to a month, but eventually you will let your guard down, make the false assumption that you have a handle on the situation, and you will end up using more than you intended.

    This is a vicious cycle that can usually only be broken with professional intervention. If you can’t stop using even when you want to, then the reality is that the substance is controlling you, not the other way around.

    If you find yourself attempting to control your drug use, then it’s time to start reaching out for help and seeking treatment at a drug rehab. You can’t get clean off sheer willpower alone. Get help so that you can finally get off the substances and learn how to maintain recovery.

  2. Your personal and/or professional life is suffering consequences.

    Maybe you are on the outs with your significant other or you got fired for calling out sick five too many times.When substance abuse is getting in the way of other important things in your life, it’s time to make a serious change. If not, your rock bottom will keep getting deeper, and you don’t want to find out how low it can go.

    If you’re suffering consequences as a result of your addiction, then it’s time to contact a drug rehab center. Consequences may not be enough to deter you from using, but seeking treatment can provide the help you need to recover and stop suffering the same consequences over and over again.

  3. You black out and don’t remember events from the time you were using.

    Can you imagine waking up to a horrible situation and not even remembering how it happened?Maybe you’ve already found yourself in this kind of scary mess. After all, this speaks for itself. Using to this point puts you in major danger for doing harmful things to yourself or others while in this state. Unprotected sex, driving under the influence, falling down the stairs, getting hit by a car – these things happen and the consequences can be deadly.

    Nothing says you need to get help for addiction more than you not remembering what happens when you get high. Blacking out from using drugs and alcohol can be extremely dangerous, and the truth is that this is no way to live.

  4. You are self-medicating.

    More often than not, addicts and alcoholics suffer from dual diagnosis, or co-occurring disorders. This means that they suffer from something like anxiety, bipolar disorder, or depression in addition to substance abuse and/or addiction.Often the drug of choice is used as a way to avoid those bad feelings and “escape.”While this may work while the person is under the influence, the truth is that drugs and alcohol actually make these kinds of mood disorders worse because of the effects on chemicals in the brain.

    If you use to numb your feelings or cope in an unhealthy manner, then you aren’t just abusing substances anymore. You are suffering from a full-blown addiction and require treatment to recover. It’s time to reach out for help, and sooner rather than later.

  5. You are still reading this article.

    If you are debating whether it is a good choice to go to rehab, the answer is more than likely a resounding “YES.”If you googled it, are wondering, can relate to reasons 1-4 in this article, take it from those who have already been there – done that, rehab will change your life and give you a new opportunity to be in charge of your future.If you needed a sign to contact a drug rehab center, like Lighthouse, then this is it. Call and get the help you need to recover from addiction today.

Drug Rehab Can Save Your Life

The bottom line is here. You are the writer of your personal story, and it doesn’t have a set ending, no matter how far down your rock bottom has become.

Many people have been exactly where you are now and have been able to change their futures by seeking help and allowing professionals to guide them.

If putting your life on hold for 30-42 days seems terrifying, just think about where you will be after that same amount of time using. Dead? In jail? A complete failure? Estranged from your family and friends? Investing the time and care in yourself instead can save your life. Going to rehab is your chance. Take it.

When it comes to addiction, consequences are typically not enough to get an addict to stop using. Going to a drug rehab center for treatment can help you discover and acknowledge what your addiction has cost you. From there, you can highlight what you are not willing to give up anymore.

By developing and practicing healthier coping skills, you can make positive changes in the way you behave and react. A drug rehab center allows you the time you need out of the environment where your addiction took hold and the opportunity to work with addiction professionals who can guide you as you work on these healthier coping mechanisms.

Recovering from addiction is a process, but it can begin at a leading drug rehab center. It all starts with getting off the substances, getting educated about the disease of addiction, and making positive changes that will support your recovery long-term.

Get the help you need today by reaching out to our leading drug and alcohol rehab facility, Lighthouse. Let us guide you every step of the way. Call Lighthouse now at 1-866-308-2090.

Searching for a Way Out of America’s Opioid Epidemic

Opioid Use is RampantAmericas Opioid Epidemic

Opioid abuse has become an all-American epidemic, unique to our country and widespread enough to be called a public health outbreak. Abuse covers all ages, races, classes, and genders, however, the most typical victim is a non-Hispanic Caucasian male in his mid-30s.

In emergency rooms, nurses are not surprised when new overdose patients are rolled in on stretchers. Overdose is becoming so widely common that many doctors no longer need to run lab tests to determine which drug caused it. Observations such as dilated pupils mean cocaine, amphetamines, and hallucinogens. Constricted pupils almost always point to an opiate.

Opiate abuse also causes the characteristic “nodding out”, scratching, cold and clammy skin. In the wrong amounts, overdose is always just a few breaths away – and when that breath begins to sound like a rattle – the person is officially in the midst of an overdose that all too frequently leads to death.

The thought of a loved one – anyone – dying like this is terrifying, and reality is that every 19 minutes, one person in this country dies of opioid overdose. Hydrocodone, OxyContin, and Percocet are three examples of this medication, the only one known to man that is routinely prescribed and kills patients so frequently.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

How Did The Opioid Epidemic Get So Bad?

The United States is embarrassingly leading the charge in opioid abuse. 75% of the world’s opioid prescription drugs are prescribed here, and it is the number one cause of preventable death. We can’t point our fingers in one direction to place blame, however, certain pharmaceutical companies and doctors certainly had a heavy hand in leading to these statistics.

The FDA was misled for years about the true nature of opioid dependence so that big pharmaceutical companies could sell more drugs and make more money. Doctors often turn a blind eye to the reality of these drugs, accepting lame scientific data and continue writing out prescriptions, ignoring the obvious red flags.

Some staggering facts include:

  • 259 million opioid prescriptions are written yearly – enough to give every American adult their own bottle of pills
  • 91% of people who survived an overdose are able to get a new prescription, often from the same doctor
  • 80% of heroin users started off using pain pills
  • As many as 4.2 million Americans have reported using heroin at least once
  • 94% of respondents in a 2014 survey of people in treatment said they chose to use heroin because prescription opioids were more expensive and difficult to obtain.
  • Heroin overdose deaths in women have tripled in the past few years.

 

Opioid AbusePutting an End to Prescription Abuse

The opioid industry has gotten so huge that it will take a long time to shift practices and make a positive change. As policy makers start to learn about the epidemic – and it can’t be ignored for much longer – they will begin to modify regulations. Small changes can already be seen, pills coming with safeguards to make them more difficult to abuse, the Centers for Disease Control recommending doctors not to prescribe opioids for chronic pain, monitoring of controlled substances, but much of the responsibility lies with each doctor.

Doctors need to discuss options and the realities of addiction with their patients and be more vigilant in what and how they are prescribing medications. Expectations must be set, and follow up is necessary. Knowing more about a patient’s history is key – for example, if a patient has a history of drug or alcohol abuse, they should never be prescribed addictive drugs. Opioids should always be considered an end-of-the-line resource instead of the first thing handed out.

Those of us in recovery are tired of hearing about friends and loved ones overdosing. We are sick of the same familiar and sad story. It isn’t too late to make a change, but in order for the severity of this to end, doctors need to step up and tighten up their prescription policies.

 

My Experiences in Addiction & Recovery

An Addict Comes Clean

By: Tim Myers

From now on I’ve decided to write my stories, my experiences, and trials. In my recovery, I’m governed by the idea that I can only pass on what’s helped or hurt me. I’ve never and will never tell or “suggest” something to another male alcoholic if I haven’t done it or experienced it firsthand.

So, based on that guiding theme, I’ll write these articles as full, uncensored, non-fictional accounts of my fifteen year journey from a drunk on the bar floor to a happy and smiling man in recovery.

Read the heartwarming story of a man and his uncle getting sober!

Experience, Strength & Hope

What has my experience taught me? Well, it’s taught me everything. Bruce Springsteen said, “You learn more from a three-minute record than you ever learn in school.”

experience in addiction

He was right. My mother’s been on the school board for over twenty years and hates that quote, but it’s true. Music has taught me that it’s okay to be different. It’s taught me to find spirituality when I didn’t know where to find it. I used to have a list of ten songs that could keep me from a drink.

“Jokes on me but it’s gonna be ok if I can just get through this lonesome day! It’s all-right, it’s all-right” The Boss

My drinking taught me that there’s evil in this world. Alcohol and drugs took me to hell. I lay in a hotel room, with a gun to my head, as my car was stolen and as I was fed drugs to keep me restrained and under control. I looked into the eyes of the men holding me down and saw nothing but dark, black nothing. I looked to the ceiling and thought to myself, “hell is a place on earth and I’m there.”

My recovery taught me that I’m not alone. Not now, not ever. It also showed me that I never was. If God wasn’t looking out for me, how did I survive getting hit by a train? How did I survive the overdose? How did I survive jumping off a building? How did I survive a suicide attempt? How did I survive a car accident?

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

It was God looking over me. It was every person I can call my friend. I t was Brian who texted me, “let me know if you need anything.” It was my therapist who didn’t give up. It was my family who held my head above the water and it was every member of AA who shared their story. My sponsors, sponsees, and everyone. They all made me feel a part of something that was so warm, so comforting, and so perfect.

I wasn’t a cast out rebel reject in my twelve-year old bedroom. I was, and am, a healthy, honest, happy man in recovery. On March sixteenth of 2014 I asked my fiancé to marry me. We were at the top of a lighthouse I’d been to so many times as a kid.

As she said yes, the sun was setting and a rainbow filled the sky. It was that day that I realized, “heaven is a place on earth.”

That’s also a song, and that’s where recovery has brought me.

So, these are my experiences. These are my stories. They won’t always be happy. They won’t always be funny. At times they’ll make you sad and maybe mad, but they will always be true.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Learn how to get sober once and for all today!

We are here to support you during your time of need and help you make the best decision for yourself or your loved one. Click below to speak to a member of our staff directly.

Menu