Tag: drug addiction

Aultra Administrative Group Can Offer Coverage for Inpatient Rehab

aultra insuranceFinding an inpatient rehab center that is in-network with your health insurance policy can be tricky. The insurance companies that drug and alcohol addiction treatment centers work with can vary.

Not only this but each policy is unique with different benefits, deductibles, and co-insurance. Even policies from the same health insurance company can differ.

Aultra Administrative Group offers health insurance that could provide coverage for your addiction treatment, depending on which policy you have.

When seeking addiction treatment and mental health counseling, you can always contact the facility of your choice to determine whether the center is in-network with your insurance. By completing a pre-assessment with our admissions department at Lighthouse, we can see what you will qualify for and the financial amount that your insurance company will cover.

Understanding Your Coverage for Inpatient Rehab

When a health insurance policy does offer coverage for substance abuse services, it is important to understand the specific details in the policy as well as any out-of-pocket expenses that may be required. You may only be able to receive addiction treatment at specific inpatient rehab centers because those centers are the only ones in-network with your policy. If this is the case, you could elect to go to an out-of-network policy and pay either a larger deductible or completely out of pocket.

For example, Aultra Administrative Group may cover substance abuse facilities that are located in several states, but they may not cover every facility in these states. This is why you will want to reach out to the facilities that you have researched to find out if your plan is in-network with them.

rehab that accepts aultra administrativeQuality and Costs of Treatment

When choosing an inpatient rehab center for your addiction treatment, it is important to understand which treatment facility will offer you the best care for your specific needs. It is also just as critical to understand what costs are associated with your treatment. However, keep in mind that treatment is an investment in your mental and physical health. Think about how much your addiction has cost you directly and indirectly. Isn’t your recovery worth it?

Finding an Inpatient Rehab Center

If you have no idea where to begin when looking for an inpatient rehab facility, then consider doing a search online and browsing the websites of different centers. You can also ask for suggestions from counselors, outpatient centers, or members you may know from 12 Step meetings, like Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous.

Finding a comprehensive drug addiction treatment program such as Lighthouse Recovery Institute, which provides individual programming, is the best place to start. Our admissions specialists can go over what your specific health insurance policy covers and if we are not in-network with your plan, we will help you find a rehab center that is.

The quickest and most effective course of action to take so that you can understand your substance abuse and mental health coverage is to submit your insurance information to our team of admissions specialists at Lighthouse.

You can complete our online contact form or call to speak to our admissions department at 1-866-308-2090.

Commonly Asked Questions about Aultra Administrative Group:

Does Aultra Administrative Group Pay for Out-of-State Treatment Centers?

Every insurance policy is different and has its own set of guidelines for coverage. Whether the insurance is an HMO, EPO or PPO will all vary on the type of treatment options available for drug treatment.

When you call Lighthouse to find out more about what your health insurance policy covers, our admissions specialists will be able to help you completely understand what is covered under your policy as well as what your options are. Our team can also determine whether or not you are able to receive out-of-state benefits under your health insurance policy for drug addiction treatment.

What Length of Time Will Aultra Administrative Group Cover Rehab?

Insurance policies provide authorization for coverage of drug treatment programs based on a term that is referred to as “medical necessity.” This is based on several factors, including medical conditions that have occurred as a result of your substance use, the amount of times you have received inpatient treatment within the calendar year, your level of motivation, and other factors that can be specific to the payer or Aultra.

By doing a comprehensive medical assessment, our admissions specialists can provide the information that you need, which may include how long your insurance policy will recover treatment at an inpatient rehab center.

Aultra Administrative Group Health Insurance will provide our team at Lighthouse with the necessary information to assist you or your loved one in your time of need.

Get Help at an Inpatient Rehab Center Today

Whether you have an insurance policy from Aultra Administrative Group or another health insurance company, Lighthouse wants to help you determine your benefits for substance use disorder treatment.

At Lighthouse, we understand that the process of getting into treatment can be very overwhelming. However, we will work with you every step of the way to make sure that you understand the process and what your coverage for treatment at a drug rehabilitation center like ours is. Contact us today and let us advocate for you to get the inpatient drug treatment you need to change your life! Call now at 1-866-308-2090.

Illegal Drug Distribution and The War Against Drug Use

Who is On Our Side in the War on Drugs? 

You would really think that everyone in the healthcare industry was as concerned as most of us are about curbing drug use in the U.S. and helping the people affected by addiction. We’re supposedly fighting this war on drugs, but are we fighting a losing battle? With instances of oxycodone manufacturers knowingly supplying a drug ring with pills, and Florida pill mills popping up, it’s hard to tell who the good guys are anymore.

An NY Times investigation revealed recently that Purdue Pharma was aware that they were supplying Oxycontin to illegal distributors and still continued to do so for a number of years. In Los Angeles, a business posing as a medical clinic was distributing massive amounts of the drug and fraudulently billing them to insurance programs. The oxycontin pills were then sold to known criminal organizations and gangs for distribution on the street.

In Florida, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) had to put a two-year suspension on Cardinal Health for turning a blind eye to massive amounts of unaccounted-for shipments of opiates like oxycontin from its own warehouse.

In both of these cases, we have major, big-time players in the healthcare industry not only playing a role in drug distribution but contributing to it. In the meantime, opioid use in the U.S. is at an all-time high and people are dying of drug overdose more than ever.

Drug Use is a Huge Problem in America

The opioid epidemic in America is still on the rise, and 9 times out of 10 these kinds of addictions begin with doctors. People go in for routine procedures, walk out with a script for an opiate, and begin to abuse the drug. Fast forward down a slippery downward spiral that only has a few stops along the way, including jail, debt, and failure, leading all the way to the final stop, death. Some people are lucky enough to receive treatment for their addiction, but way too many addicts still do not get the help they need.

Facts About Opiate Use in the US

  • 1.9 million people report having a substance abuse disorder involving prescription pain pills, vs. only 586,000 that have a substance use issue with heroin.
  • Drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in the U.S.
  • 47,055 lethal drug overdoses occurred in 2014, which is the last recorded year. Of these deaths, 18,893 ODs resulted from prescription pain pills. That’s 40%!
  • 4 out of 5 heroin users started their habit with an addiction to prescription painkillers.
  • Heroin overdoses nearly quadrupled from 2000 to 2013.
  • In 2012, 259 million scripts were written for opioids. This would be enough to give each American their own bottle of pills.

 

With facts like these, it’s clear that something needs to be done about opiate use. Unfortunately, a lot of people seem to be in the business for the money, and turning a blind eye to who they may be selling drugs to, and consequently who they are killing off. This fight may mean nothing to them, but to the families and loved ones affected by drug use, a change would mean the world.

Brittany Ringersen on NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt.

Brittany Ringersen speaks out on NBC’s Nightly News

Kate Snow, a national correspondent for NBC’s Nightly News, speaks with Lighthouse Recovery Institutes founder Brittany Ringersen about the dangers of addiction following a routine dentist visit. Brittany draws on her own experience and explains how a routine visit to the dentist office was the beginning of a dark long path of addiction. Their discussion reveals the pitfalls that come with pain medication and the strong warnings that need to come before taking them.

Click here to read the full article on NBC

A Wrongful Field Drug Test Could Ruin Your Life

A Field Drug Test Gone Wrong 

A field drug test is something that cops keep on them to test substances found in people’s vehicles or in their possession. A crumb found on the floor in your car, or powder in your pocket – any of that can be tested with a quick dip into one of these kits. On more than one occasion, these tests have gone wrong – indicating an illegal substance when none was present. This simple mistake has ruined lives.

In Amy Albritton’s case, she was on the road in Houston with her boyfriend at the time when they were pulled over by the cops. The officers suspected that drugs were in the car, and tested a white crumb on her floor. The field test indicated that the crumb was crack cocaine. Because the car belonged to Albritton, she ended up being charged as a felon.

False Positive Field Drug Test Means a Felony Charge

Albritton spent 21 days in jail, lost her job, and lost her apartment. It took years for her to rebuild her life, all with a felony conviction hanging over her head. She was turned away from job opportunities and places to live, all because of her record. She never disputed the cops because she thought the chemical evidence was there, in the test, and she also hadn’t known her boyfriend for very long at the time. She thought maybe he had something to do with the drugs in the car.

Years later, in 2014, Albritton got a letter in the mail telling her she was wrongfully convicted. They had re-tested her sample and it was negative – likely just a piece of food or lint that had made its way onto the floor of her car. In that district attorney’s office alone, 251 cases of incorrect evidence were found between 2004 and 2015 – all people who were named guilty but were actually innocent.

Wrongful Field Drug Tests Are Not Unusual

There are so many cases like hers that deserve more attention. Being labeled a felon has serious consequences that can affect a person’s work life, where they live, and how they are viewed by society. Additionally, it isn’t easy to reverse a wrongful felony conviction. Even after it is overturned, the reversal needs to be finalized by a trial court. And then, once the charge is cleared, in today’s digital world, the felony is shared with hundreds – if not thousands – of websites.

It’s an ordeal to get rid of, but better to finally prove your innocence than spending the rest of your life with the wrongful charge hanging over your head.

 

Using Drugs as a Treatment for Substance Abuse

Using Drugs to Treat Drug AddictionTreatment for Substance Abuse

Treatment for substance abuse is a complex field with many options and theories out there. One that is always a subject of debate is using drugs as a treatment for substance abuse. There are many variations of this – from using drugs in a medical setting to help ease withdrawal symptoms to using popular new drugs like Kratom to help people stay away from opioids. It’s a thin line in what’s ok and what isn’t, and some argue that using drugs is never the correct route to take.

In Treatment for Substance Abuse, Medication for Detox is Important

One thing that not many people can disagree with is the idea that using medication while patients are in acute detox is important to help ease their discomfort and prevent medical distress like seizures or heart problems. This should be done in a medically supervised environment with doctors and nurses frequently monitoring a patient’s vital signs.

Many addiction treatment centers offer a medically assisted and monitored detox. In addition to being safer for the patient, having more comfort during the first crucial days of sobriety might help them achieve long-term sobriety. Often, addicts simply can’t make it through the detox process and end up going back to using before it is over.

One Addiction Shouldn’t Be Substitute for Another

Addiction is addiction, period. While it is true that heroin is most likely worse than marijuana, in the end, it is all in the same boat, and one easily leads to another. If a person is striving for a sober life, it is important that they eliminate all substances to make it count.

Marijuana Treatment for Substance AbuseRecently, a petition was filed in Maine, asking to permit medical marijuana to be used for the treatment of addiction to heroin and other opioids. It was denied however tests are still being done to see if it could be an effective treatment. They say the petition was filed as an answer to Maine’s growing opioid epidemic. It’s difficult, however, to argue the value in using drugs as a treatment for substance abuse, when there are options out there that don’t require the use of other addictive substances

Bouncing from Substance to Substance is Not An Effective Way To Beat Addiction

The worst thing a person can do is to decide to take things into their own hands and try out a different or “less dangerous” drug to help with their addiction. First of all, mixing any drugs is dangerous, and a person in active addiction is unlikely to have enough willpower to stop using their old drug of choice.

Additionally, when a person begins to use a new drug, their bodies aren’t used to the effects, and they don’t know how much they can tolerate. This is a gray area that is better off avoided because it carries with it a lot of danger of overdose and negative consequences.

 

Mixing Alcohol and Vicodin is a Big Deal

Alcohol and Vicodin LighthouseMixing Prescription Drugs with Alcohol is Like Playing Russian Roulette

Alcohol and Vicodin can be a deadly combination. There are a handful of prescription drugs that people regularly take with alcohol. Vicodin and alcohol mixing is common, as is Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, Adderal, and many, many others. People often take these medicines and have no idea how harmful it truly is, and that it could even lead to sudden death. Here we’re going to focus primarily on Vicodin and the dangers of mixing it with alcohol.

Most people don’t know exactly why and how combining drugs can become toxic in a person’s body even in small doses. As far as alcohol and Vicodin go, this is what happens.

The Effects of Alcohol and Vicodin on Your Body

Separately, painkillers and alcohol have very different effects. They are different chemicals that have different purposes when introduced into the body. When combined, the chemicals can interact and cause a toxic combination that overwhelms a person’s system before your body can eliminate the toxins. Think of it as your body working on overtime and it just can’t keep up.

Excessive hydrocodone in Vicodin can cause memory loss, confusion, and breathing issues, many of the same things that excessive alcohol causes. Besides acute medical emergencies like cardiac and breathing problems, combining the two drugs can have an enormously negative impact on a person’s liver.

Mixing Drugs Is Not About How Much But How Your Body Tolerates It

Taking alcohol and Vicodin together can suppress the system so much so that a person’s breathing can stop completely. The FDA advises that people who are prescribed Vicodin should not drink any alcohol at all. Every person has a different body chemistry and will have a different reaction to any foreign substance that they put in their body.

You can have two people who weigh the same and have a similar body composure. One will be able to tolerate the mixture, and the second person might slip into a coma and die from the same amount. It’s a game of Russian Roulette that no one should ever play because it just isn’t worth it.

If you have consumed alcohol and Vicodin, some warning signs of overdose include:alcohol and vicodin

  • Excessive tiredness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Slow or weak pulse
  • Lack of coordination and control
  • Falling out of consciousness
  • Disorientation.

If anyone you know exhibits these kind of symptoms after ingesting a substance, get medical help for them immediately.

It is always better to err on the side of caution when combining drugs and alcohol. If you aren’t sure, don’t do it. And by all means, if there is a warning label against drinking alcohol, stay away! Drug combinations cause so many useless deaths per year. A little vigilance could save a lot of lives.

 

The Meaning of Humility in Addiction Recovery

The Definition of Recovery in Addiction, Staying Humble and Expressing Gratitude.

Meaning of HumilityHumility is a big part of addiction recovery and it’s no wonder that those contemplating rehabilitation want to know the meaning of humility. To accept defeat, in that you are not more powerful than your addiction, you must be humble. To re-start your life, you must be humble. To call yourself an addict, to attend meetings, to go to rehab, to go to a halfway house and to apologize for the damage you caused in your addiction, you must be humble.

Definition of Humility (noun): The quality or condition of being humble, modest opinion or estimate of one’s importance.

Being humble, and being able to define humble, means that a person is capable of accepting their own limitations and weaknesses. They aren’t arrogant or overconfident in what they can achieve. This does not mean they are spineless. Humble people can stand up for their rights while gracefully acknowledging where they lack and what they can improve in. They are the people, who ponder what do you mean by humility, who can take advice and constructive criticism in stride and use it only to improve upon themselves.

Humble People who Know the Meaning of Humility Make Addiction Recovery Work

In the midst of addiction, addicts tend to suffer from low self-esteem. As a result, and as a defense mechanism, they act arrogant to throw people off and make them think otherwise. These people do not know the definition of recovery in addiction. Arrogance makes it difficult for people to learn new things, especially to accept help from other people and actually get the treatment they need for their addiction. They are afraid of their addiction and true colors coming to light.

Meaning of HumilityOn the flip side, once a person can define humble and becomes humble enough to go to treatment they begin to slowly become more and more humble as they go through treatment and recognize what they have been putting themselves and all of their loved ones through. It is at this time that people are most open to getting treatment and taking the advice of their doctors, therapists and peers.

True Definition of Humility Extends Far Past Rehab

Asking “what do you mean by humility,” and then staying humble, is essential when a person first leaves treatment. In many cases, they will be starting all over again, finding a new job, new place to live and new friends. Starting over like this is tough. You may need to accept a lower-paying job than you have in the past and agree to live in a halfway house because you still need accountability and supervision. All of this is okay,  as bravado and a false sense of confidence will only do you harm when you are in such a vulnerable spot. The more accepting you can be, the better.

Taking the time to define humble also teaches gratitude: Appreciating each day you have sober, each milestone you hit, each raise you get (even if you are still not where you used to be), each sunrise, sunset, and special moment you have with the people you love. Gratitude will get you far in recovery, taking things day-by-day, and appreciating each little moment you are gifted with.

Destroyed By Addiction. Saved By A Delray Beach Rehab.

Going to a Delray Beach Rehab Saved My Ldelray beach rehab lighthouseife

Eight months ago, I was homeless, unemployed, and soulless, all because I was completely and totally dependent on heroin. I know I definitely had zero intention of going to a Delray Beach Rehab. I literally slept under bridges and on park benches. I was a shell of the person I used to be, nodding out from too much heroin when I managed to score some, or running around the worst parts of town like a zombie in need of blood from The Walking Dead when I was looking for more of my drug. It was my lifeline. I was so in over my head that everyone had given up on me because the pain of watching me go downhill was too much for them. They knew there was nothing left they could do.

My Darkest Days As A Heroin Addict

I didn’t think about going to rehab. I didn’t care to. My life was what was right in front of me: the endless pursuit of my next hit. I didn’t give a damn about anything else. It’s hard to put into words what that kind of life is like. You are no longer a part of society, it’s almost as if you are one of the feral cats roaming the streets. Not a cute kitten, but one that looks like it has been in daily fights for years and most likely has rabies. That was me.

heroin addiction lighthouse recoveryI was living this way for a little over a year. How I survived I’ll never know. I got picked up by the cops one spring morning as I was hanging out with my dope dealer, up to no good in a seedy hotel room. I would have once through that room was disgusting, but in my current state at the time it was a luxury. The cops stormed in, it wasn’t the first time I had a gun pointed at my face, and I was taken away in handcuffs.

My sentence included rehab. I thought it was a joke, but I agreed to go so that some of my legal problems would go away. Off I went to a South Florida, with my destination being a Delray Beach rehab center.

My First Week at The Delray Beach Rehab

When I got to admissions, I was 105 pounds, which was entirely too little for my 5’5, naturally curvy frame. They drug tested me, asked me a million questions, and the detox process started. The next few days were horrible, hot, painful, stomach churning, sad, horrifying, and shameful. It took about 5 full days for me to feel somewhat human and to begin participating in groups, meeting with my therapist, and eating substantial meals.

When I was with it enough to speak with my therapist one on one, we actually called my parents and brother, who knew where I was but had been so estranged that we hadn’t talked to or seen each other in nearly a year. We all cried. They agreed to come in and visit me over the course of my stay.

By the end of my first week at rehab, I had come to enough to realize the severity of how I had been living my life and wished I could go back to being the cheerleading, tennis playing, peppy teenage girl I had lighthouse delray beach rehabonce been. However, I couldn’t dwell in the past if I wanted to move forward, so ahead I looked.

Learning About Myself at The Delray Recovery Center

In the rest of my time at treatment, I had the opportunity to learn more about myself than I ever knew I could. I learned the how’s and why’s of my addiction and I realized that I can actually change if I want to. Knowing that was hugely empowering, because once you break away from the addiction, you have the power to get your life back.

Sober Living in Delray

I left rehab after 60 days and continued my treatment by living in sober living in Delray beach while attending an intensive outpatient program. I did the work, and it was tough. I wanted to kill people some days, and I certainly wanted to get high. But my newfound connection with a higher power and myself helped me to stay sober, minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day.

Scars of My PaDelray Beach Rehabst and Hope for My Future

I still have scars of my addiction. I have legal problems that are still waiting to be resolved, I contracted Hepatitis C while using needles, I’m still repairing relationships with my family, and I still struggle with my addiction daily. But I’m eight months sober on the day I’m writing this, and I never thought that would be possible.

If someone as low in their life as I was can do it, anyone can. No matter who you are, what your circumstances are, or how low you have gone, there is hope, and you can have your life back.

 

Treating Addiction to Opiate Drugs

Opiate Drugs Lighthouse RecoveryIs Medication Assisted Therapy the Solution for Addiction to Opiate Drugs?

Addiction to opiate drugs is a huge problem in the United States, as is no secret if you have been paying attention to the news at all. From all the fatal overdoses going on around the country to the high-profile death of music legend Prince, opioid addiction is a very real problem that must be faced. A solution must be found before more needless deaths occur. Different treatments are out there, but what is most effective?

Opiate Abuse Changes the Brain

When thinking about a solution, we also need to think about how opiate abuse affecOpioid Addiction Lighthouse Recoveryts the brain. Every drug, even alcohol, has short and long-term effects on the brain, and these effects create a very real chemical change that needs to be addressed to achieve sobriety. A big debate going on right now is whether it is appropriate to treat drug addiction with more drugs. On one side, drugs are the root of the issue at hand and should be eliminated completely. On the other, in a medically supervised environment, taking the right drugs the right way is a temporary crutch on the path to complete sobriety.

Medication Assisted Therapy

Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) has been used for addiction to opiate drugs because it helps reduce the cravings caused by opioid addiction. They also help to reduce the symptoms of withdrawal, which alone can cause a relapse because of their intense discomfort. With MAT, patients receive therapy hand in hand with medication, and the results are positive – in a study conducted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, over 50% of opioid addicts who were treated with buprenorphine or naloxone remained sober after 18 months.

Recovery from Addiction to Opiate DrugsAddiction and Prescription Medication

The drugs used to treat opioid addiction are themselves serious medications that can cause addiction if unsupervised. With MAT and the understanding that addiction is an ongoing battle that can last a lifetime, medications can be controlled to create well-being and recovery success. Recovery is a long-term process and not a quick-fix or overnight success.

Addiction always has been and still is considered taboo in our culture, but statistics on opiate use and the number of people addiction to opiate drugs suggest that we need to start making this more mainstream so that real solutions can be found.

 

Golf, Scandal, and the Dangers of Cocaine and Alcohol

cocaine and alcohol lighthouseDustin Johnson’s Drug Abuse Highlights Cocaine and Alcohol

American professional golfer Dustin Johnson just won the 116th U.S. Open, but it hasn’t always been smooth sailing for him, especially not when it comes to his personal life. Johnson tested positive for marijuana, cocaine and alcohol three times in his pro golfing career and was suspended once as a result. In a sport that suffered from a ton of shame after the downfall of golf legend Tiger Woods, another story like this isn’t a surprise, and sports officials seem to want to sweep this all under the rug.

Tiger Woods, Golf, and Performance Enhancing Drugs

This isn’t the first time that big-time scandalous behavior has been kept quiet in the golf world. While Tiger Woods was galavanting around with scores of women and using performance-enhancing drugs, he was also climbing the ladder as the biggest star in the golf world. His reputations ended up crashing down in flames as him and his ex-wife  had a very public falling out about his extra-marital affairs and otherwise terrible behavior.

Fast forward to today, and we have Dustin Johnson who reportedly tested positive three times for illegal drugs. He has brought up that binge drinking was a big problem for him, more so than drugs, but anyone who has had experience with one knows that they can quickly go hand in hand and out of control fast.

Cocaine and Alcohol

Cocaine and alcohol addictionJohnson tested positive for cocaine three times in five years, and allegedly carried on liaisons with multiple wives of fellow players. While he has not admitted to those affairs, he talks about how his trouble with alcohol forced him to take a hiatus from pro golf and focus on bettering himself.

While Johnson does not fully admit to his cocaine use, the drug tests say otherwise. Cocaine and alcohol is a common combination, as they work as polar opposites and cocaine can serve to keep a person wide awake when alcohol would make them fall asleep. It’s a false sense of wellbeing that can actually be a fatal combination.

Cocaethylene: The Lethal Combination of Cocaine and Alcohol

Ingesting cocaine and alcohol at the same time is unfortunately common, and the combination actually produces a drug called Cocaethylene in the liver. It poses an extremely high risk for heart attack, high blood pressure, and other heart and cardiovascular issues. Over time with repeated use, cocaethylene builds up in the liver and causes long-term health effects.

According to several different studies, the presence of cocaethylene in a person’s system produces feelings of euphoria that are more powerful and longer-lasting than those produced by cocaine alone. However, the health risks become that much more serious, and sudden death is a true threat.

Drug Combinations Are Lethal

Golf Pro Johnson is lucky that his cocaine and alcohol habit didn’t lead to his demise. Combining any drugs with alcohol or cocaethylene lighthouse recoveryother drugs is notoriously lethal, and often leads to hospitalization, overdose, and death. This is something to be mindful of even with prescription drugs – warnings on labels exist for a reason, so make sure to pay attention to them. This is especially true with any kinds of drugs that have to do with anxiety or pain – both drugs suppress the central nervous system, so combining these kinds of drugs with alcohol or street drugs can prove deadly.

It is possible to overcome any kind of drug addiction with the right help and the right people to support you. The first step is recognizing you have a problem and educating yourself, and then getting the help you need from there.

We are here to support you during your time of need and help you make the best decision for yourself or your loved one. Click below to speak to a member of our staff directly.

Lighthouse Recovery Institute