Tag: drug treatment

Why You Shouldn’t Go To An Opiate Rehab in New Jersey.

Opiate Rehab New Jersey? No, its time for a change.

You used opiates in New Jersey, does that mean you can’t stay sober in New Jersey… No. I will tell you though that it is much, much easier to get and stay sober in a place your body and mind isn’t already associating with Opiates. Going to an opiate rehab in New Jersey and returning to New jersey after your treatment is a recipe for disaster. This is not because New Jersey is a bad place. It is because the opiate rehab is in New Jersey.

That you want to go to is also in the same state you got high in. This is going to cause so so so so so many problems for you body mind and soul.

Opiate Rehab in New Jersey Will Not Work.

Changing people, places and things is the first thing any opiate addict is told to do when entering an opiate rehab in New Jersey or heroin detox in New Jersey. So my question to these institution of recovery in New Jersey is, why do you take people from your home state? “Triggers, not drugs are shown to be longest lasting relapse risk” as told by Psychology Today. The places you used to cop heroin will make you want to shoot up. Seeing your old heroin using friends and dealers will make you want to use. The body and mind latch on to these familiar sights, sounds and smells of opiate addiction and use them against your recovery. Attending an opiate rehab in New Jersey is not going to yield a successful recovery. Going to an opiate rehab in Florida will.

Heroin Rehab in Florida Will Work

Heroin and opiate addicts from all over the country have being moving to Florida in droves of the last 10 years. Instead of checking in to an opiate rehab in New Jersey or a heroin detox in New Jersey, opiate addicts are finding new life in the sunshine state. Opiate rehab in Florida has proven to work for people coming from outside Florida because for many it is drastically different than their home state and Florida has more people in recovery from heroin and opiates than any other state in the country. Many of these addicts in Florida have already tried the opiate rehab in New Jersey and the heroin detox in New Jersey. The results did not come because no attention was paid to the external factors that doctors have been warning us about since the 1940’s.

Push the reset button on your addiction.

Can you back to New Jersey? Yes! You! Can! I just think and so do the doctors that starting your new life will be much easier in your forgo the opiate rehab in New Jersey and start fresh. Begin that life miles away from the old places and people that scientist say will be lodged in your brain for years. You can always go back home once you have some time under your belt. You can always visit, but you need to give your heart and your mind a break. Get to Florida, start over. You’ll be glad you did and you’ll be surprised to find that most of New Jersey’s former addicts are already there.

Rehab That Accepts Blue Cross And Blue Shield Of Illinois Saves My Life

A Rehab That Accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois Is Amazing.

My parents had tapped out. They were done paying for my drug rehabs. Over 28 years they had paid for 8 different drug rehabs and now they were done. I had just gotten Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois health insurance from my retail job and man, I was so grateful. The heroin had ruined my life for good this time. I needed to find a rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois to save my life. I knew that if I put that needle in my arm one more time it would be my last. I had a child taken away from me, my girlfriend was up state in prison and it was up to me to get clean once and for all. I searched many places for a drug rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois and I finally found the best one for me, Lighthouse Recovery Institute.

Lighthouse Recovery Institute was the Best Drug Rehab for Me and My Insurance.

I called the admissions staff at Lighthouse Recovery Institute and was in tears when I found out that they were a rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois. Within 24 hours I was on a plane and headed to Delray Beach Florida. Lighthouse Recovery Institute, a rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois, talked to my provider and all of my care was covered. All I had to focus on was doing the next right thing and listening to my drug rehab therapist. I kept my head down and my nose clean and thanked God that Lighthouse recovery Institute has gender specific treatment, because I can never focus with women around.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois Covered My IOP Treatment

I did what I was supposed to do inside and outside of my drug rehab and there were no surprises when I completed my IOP treatment at Lighthouse Recovery Institute. Just like they said, Lighthouse Recovery Institute was a rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois and al my treatment had been covered. I was free to go out and go back to work and keep working my drug rehab after care program. I didn’t have to go into debt or stay on the streets. Because my drug rehab was in fact a rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois, my life changed for ever.

I have not used heroin in 5 years

Now that I have been clean and sober for over 5 years I am happy to report that I am a father to my son again and that my life is incredible. I have become the manager of the company that helped me find the drug rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois and I even help people at Lighthouse Recovery Institute stay sober. It’s a wonderful life. I hope some day my girlfriend find recovery too. If she asks for my opinion I’ll make sure I tell her to find a rehab that accepts Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois.

Should I Go To A Drug And Alcohol Rehab In State Or Out Of State

Changing location matters when picking a drug and alcohol rehab.

When it comes to drug and alcohol rehab I’m an expert. You see in the past 35 years I’m been to 9 of them. I know people who have been to the dentist less times then I have been in rehab. The first time I went to drug and alcohol rehab, I went out of state. I was living with my parents in New York. After one of the saddest mornings in my life, found me on route 81 bound for drug and alcohol rehab. My 6-year-old sister found me passed out in the bathroom singing. She stood over me calling my name but only my lips moved. The drug and alcohol rehab I went to was 4 hours away and a different state than the one my parents lived in was chosen for the simple fact that, they needed a break.

Substance Abuse Recovery Is Difficult Close To Home

Being located at a drug and alcohol rehab that was 4 hours away took running away out of the picture and it kept my parents pretty far away. They couldn’t run to see me every time I cried, and boy did I cry. I wanted drugs, I needed to drink, but all I could see outside those doors in Pennsylvania was black bears and trees. So the drug and alcohol rehab must have worked right? I must have found a great substance abuse recovery program right? Wrong.

Aftercare Services in Addiction Treatment Should Be Far from Home.

Here’s what happened next, I went right back home to my home town and found all the drugs and alcohol were right where I left them, in the crack houses and liquor stores I knew so well. I went right back to using and saw my sister again crying and holding on to the leg of my Mom as I was dragged out the door again to another drug and alcohol rehab in another state this time, Minnesota, then Minnesota again, then Utah, then in state in NY 5 minutes from my parents house, then Pennsylvania again, then Florida… twice.

Rehab and Aftercare Out of State Worked

Confused? Probably. Here’s the point. Drug and alcohol rehab can be either out of state or in state but what worked best for me was when the aftercare and the recovery community I would be joining were all far from my home. This forced me to stay in touch with my drug and alcohol rehab and make friends in the new substance abuse recovery community. If my old friends were around and my family was there, I would not have learned how to pick myself up. That is the key to the whole question of should I go to a drug and alcohol rehab in state or out of state? Go where you will be forced to pick your self up using only the help of the drug and alcohol rehab and
substance abuse recovery community. When we are away from our family we can focus on ourselves. Then when we meet then again we can give only the best we have learned in our recovery. That’s what happened to me. Now my sister is 19 and in college and remembers only how much I love her.

Illegal Drug Distribution and The War Against Drug Use

Who is On Our Side in the War on Drugs? 

You would really think that everyone in the healthcare industry was as concerned as most of us are about curbing drug use in the U.S. and helping the people affected by addiction. We’re supposedly fighting this war on drugs, but are we fighting a losing battle? With instances of oxycodone manufacturers knowingly supplying a drug ring with pills, and Florida pill mills popping up, it’s hard to tell who the good guys are anymore.

An NY Times investigation revealed recently that Purdue Pharma was aware that they were supplying Oxycontin to illegal distributors and still continued to do so for a number of years. In Los Angeles, a business posing as a medical clinic was distributing massive amounts of the drug and fraudulently billing them to insurance programs. The oxycontin pills were then sold to known criminal organizations and gangs for distribution on the street.

In Florida, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) had to put a two-year suspension on Cardinal Health for turning a blind eye to massive amounts of unaccounted-for shipments of opiates like oxycontin from its own warehouse.

In both of these cases, we have major, big-time players in the healthcare industry not only playing a role in drug distribution but contributing to it. In the meantime, opioid use in the U.S. is at an all-time high and people are dying of drug overdose more than ever.

Drug Use is a Huge Problem in America

The opioid epidemic in America is still on the rise, and 9 times out of 10 these kinds of addictions begin with doctors. People go in for routine procedures, walk out with a script for an opiate, and begin to abuse the drug. Fast forward down a slippery downward spiral that only has a few stops along the way, including jail, debt, and failure, leading all the way to the final stop, death. Some people are lucky enough to receive treatment for their addiction, but way too many addicts still do not get the help they need.

Facts About Opiate Use in the US

  • 1.9 million people report having a substance abuse disorder involving prescription pain pills, vs. only 586,000 that have a substance use issue with heroin.
  • Drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in the U.S.
  • 47,055 lethal drug overdoses occurred in 2014, which is the last recorded year. Of these deaths, 18,893 ODs resulted from prescription pain pills. That’s 40%!
  • 4 out of 5 heroin users started their habit with an addiction to prescription painkillers.
  • Heroin overdoses nearly quadrupled from 2000 to 2013.
  • In 2012, 259 million scripts were written for opioids. This would be enough to give each American their own bottle of pills.

 

With facts like these, it’s clear that something needs to be done about opiate use. Unfortunately, a lot of people seem to be in the business for the money, and turning a blind eye to who they may be selling drugs to, and consequently who they are killing off. This fight may mean nothing to them, but to the families and loved ones affected by drug use, a change would mean the world.

A Wrongful Field Drug Test Could Ruin Your Life

A Field Drug Test Gone Wrong 

A field drug test is something that cops keep on them to test substances found in people’s vehicles or in their possession. A crumb found on the floor in your car, or powder in your pocket – any of that can be tested with a quick dip into one of these kits. On more than one occasion, these tests have gone wrong – indicating an illegal substance when none was present. This simple mistake has ruined lives.

In Amy Albritton’s case, she was on the road in Houston with her boyfriend at the time when they were pulled over by the cops. The officers suspected that drugs were in the car, and tested a white crumb on her floor. The field test indicated that the crumb was crack cocaine. Because the car belonged to Albritton, she ended up being charged as a felon.

False Positive Field Drug Test Means a Felony Charge

Albritton spent 21 days in jail, lost her job, and lost her apartment. It took years for her to rebuild her life, all with a felony conviction hanging over her head. She was turned away from job opportunities and places to live, all because of her record. She never disputed the cops because she thought the chemical evidence was there, in the test, and she also hadn’t known her boyfriend for very long at the time. She thought maybe he had something to do with the drugs in the car.

Years later, in 2014, Albritton got a letter in the mail telling her she was wrongfully convicted. They had re-tested her sample and it was negative – likely just a piece of food or lint that had made its way onto the floor of her car. In that district attorney’s office alone, 251 cases of incorrect evidence were found between 2004 and 2015 – all people who were named guilty but were actually innocent.

Wrongful Field Drug Tests Are Not Unusual

There are so many cases like hers that deserve more attention. Being labeled a felon has serious consequences that can affect a person’s work life, where they live, and how they are viewed by society. Additionally, it isn’t easy to reverse a wrongful felony conviction. Even after it is overturned, the reversal needs to be finalized by a trial court. And then, once the charge is cleared, in today’s digital world, the felony is shared with hundreds – if not thousands – of websites.

It’s an ordeal to get rid of, but better to finally prove your innocence than spending the rest of your life with the wrongful charge hanging over your head.

 

Using Drugs as a Treatment for Substance Abuse

Using Drugs to Treat Drug AddictionTreatment for Substance Abuse

Treatment for substance abuse is a complex field with many options and theories out there. One that is always a subject of debate is using drugs as a treatment for substance abuse. There are many variations of this – from using drugs in a medical setting to help ease withdrawal symptoms to using popular new drugs like Kratom to help people stay away from opioids. It’s a thin line in what’s ok and what isn’t, and some argue that using drugs is never the correct route to take.

In Treatment for Substance Abuse, Medication for Detox is Important

One thing that not many people can disagree with is the idea that using medication while patients are in acute detox is important to help ease their discomfort and prevent medical distress like seizures or heart problems. This should be done in a medically supervised environment with doctors and nurses frequently monitoring a patient’s vital signs.

Many addiction treatment centers offer a medically assisted and monitored detox. In addition to being safer for the patient, having more comfort during the first crucial days of sobriety might help them achieve long-term sobriety. Often, addicts simply can’t make it through the detox process and end up going back to using before it is over.

One Addiction Shouldn’t Be Substitute for Another

Addiction is addiction, period. While it is true that heroin is most likely worse than marijuana, in the end, it is all in the same boat, and one easily leads to another. If a person is striving for a sober life, it is important that they eliminate all substances to make it count.

Marijuana Treatment for Substance AbuseRecently, a petition was filed in Maine, asking to permit medical marijuana to be used for the treatment of addiction to heroin and other opioids. It was denied however tests are still being done to see if it could be an effective treatment. They say the petition was filed as an answer to Maine’s growing opioid epidemic. It’s difficult, however, to argue the value in using drugs as a treatment for substance abuse, when there are options out there that don’t require the use of other addictive substances

Bouncing from Substance to Substance is Not An Effective Way To Beat Addiction

The worst thing a person can do is to decide to take things into their own hands and try out a different or “less dangerous” drug to help with their addiction. First of all, mixing any drugs is dangerous, and a person in active addiction is unlikely to have enough willpower to stop using their old drug of choice.

Additionally, when a person begins to use a new drug, their bodies aren’t used to the effects, and they don’t know how much they can tolerate. This is a gray area that is better off avoided because it carries with it a lot of danger of overdose and negative consequences.

 

The Meaning of Humility in Addiction Recovery

The Definition of Recovery in Addiction, Staying Humble and Expressing Gratitude.

Meaning of HumilityHumility is a big part of addiction recovery and it’s no wonder that those contemplating rehabilitation want to know the meaning of humility. To accept defeat, in that you are not more powerful than your addiction, you must be humble. To re-start your life, you must be humble. To call yourself an addict, to attend meetings, to go to rehab, to go to a halfway house and to apologize for the damage you caused in your addiction, you must be humble.

Definition of Humility (noun): The quality or condition of being humble, modest opinion or estimate of one’s importance.

Being humble, and being able to define humble, means that a person is capable of accepting their own limitations and weaknesses. They aren’t arrogant or overconfident in what they can achieve. This does not mean they are spineless. Humble people can stand up for their rights while gracefully acknowledging where they lack and what they can improve in. They are the people, who ponder what do you mean by humility, who can take advice and constructive criticism in stride and use it only to improve upon themselves.

Humble People who Know the Meaning of Humility Make Addiction Recovery Work

In the midst of addiction, addicts tend to suffer from low self-esteem. As a result, and as a defense mechanism, they act arrogant to throw people off and make them think otherwise. These people do not know the definition of recovery in addiction. Arrogance makes it difficult for people to learn new things, especially to accept help from other people and actually get the treatment they need for their addiction. They are afraid of their addiction and true colors coming to light.

Meaning of HumilityOn the flip side, once a person can define humble and becomes humble enough to go to treatment they begin to slowly become more and more humble as they go through treatment and recognize what they have been putting themselves and all of their loved ones through. It is at this time that people are most open to getting treatment and taking the advice of their doctors, therapists and peers.

True Definition of Humility Extends Far Past Rehab

Asking “what do you mean by humility,” and then staying humble, is essential when a person first leaves treatment. In many cases, they will be starting all over again, finding a new job, new place to live and new friends. Starting over like this is tough. You may need to accept a lower-paying job than you have in the past and agree to live in a halfway house because you still need accountability and supervision. All of this is okay,  as bravado and a false sense of confidence will only do you harm when you are in such a vulnerable spot. The more accepting you can be, the better.

Taking the time to define humble also teaches gratitude: Appreciating each day you have sober, each milestone you hit, each raise you get (even if you are still not where you used to be), each sunrise, sunset, and special moment you have with the people you love. Gratitude will get you far in recovery, taking things day-by-day, and appreciating each little moment you are gifted with.

Destroyed By Addiction. Saved By A Delray Beach Rehab.

Going to a Delray Beach Rehab Saved My Ldelray beach rehab lighthouseife

Eight months ago, I was homeless, unemployed, and soulless, all because I was completely and totally dependent on heroin. I know I definitely had zero intention of going to a Delray Beach Rehab. I literally slept under bridges and on park benches. I was a shell of the person I used to be, nodding out from too much heroin when I managed to score some, or running around the worst parts of town like a zombie in need of blood from The Walking Dead when I was looking for more of my drug. It was my lifeline. I was so in over my head that everyone had given up on me because the pain of watching me go downhill was too much for them. They knew there was nothing left they could do.

My Darkest Days As A Heroin Addict

I didn’t think about going to rehab. I didn’t care to. My life was what was right in front of me: the endless pursuit of my next hit. I didn’t give a damn about anything else. It’s hard to put into words what that kind of life is like. You are no longer a part of society, it’s almost as if you are one of the feral cats roaming the streets. Not a cute kitten, but one that looks like it has been in daily fights for years and most likely has rabies. That was me.

heroin addiction lighthouse recoveryI was living this way for a little over a year. How I survived I’ll never know. I got picked up by the cops one spring morning as I was hanging out with my dope dealer, up to no good in a seedy hotel room. I would have once through that room was disgusting, but in my current state at the time it was a luxury. The cops stormed in, it wasn’t the first time I had a gun pointed at my face, and I was taken away in handcuffs.

My sentence included rehab. I thought it was a joke, but I agreed to go so that some of my legal problems would go away. Off I went to a South Florida, with my destination being a Delray Beach rehab center.

My First Week at The Delray Beach Rehab

When I got to admissions, I was 105 pounds, which was entirely too little for my 5’5, naturally curvy frame. They drug tested me, asked me a million questions, and the detox process started. The next few days were horrible, hot, painful, stomach churning, sad, horrifying, and shameful. It took about 5 full days for me to feel somewhat human and to begin participating in groups, meeting with my therapist, and eating substantial meals.

When I was with it enough to speak with my therapist one on one, we actually called my parents and brother, who knew where I was but had been so estranged that we hadn’t talked to or seen each other in nearly a year. We all cried. They agreed to come in and visit me over the course of my stay.

By the end of my first week at rehab, I had come to enough to realize the severity of how I had been living my life and wished I could go back to being the cheerleading, tennis playing, peppy teenage girl I had lighthouse delray beach rehabonce been. However, I couldn’t dwell in the past if I wanted to move forward, so ahead I looked.

Learning About Myself at The Delray Recovery Center

In the rest of my time at treatment, I had the opportunity to learn more about myself than I ever knew I could. I learned the how’s and why’s of my addiction and I realized that I can actually change if I want to. Knowing that was hugely empowering, because once you break away from the addiction, you have the power to get your life back.

Sober Living in Delray

I left rehab after 60 days and continued my treatment by living in sober living in Delray beach while attending an intensive outpatient program. I did the work, and it was tough. I wanted to kill people some days, and I certainly wanted to get high. But my newfound connection with a higher power and myself helped me to stay sober, minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day.

Scars of My PaDelray Beach Rehabst and Hope for My Future

I still have scars of my addiction. I have legal problems that are still waiting to be resolved, I contracted Hepatitis C while using needles, I’m still repairing relationships with my family, and I still struggle with my addiction daily. But I’m eight months sober on the day I’m writing this, and I never thought that would be possible.

If someone as low in their life as I was can do it, anyone can. No matter who you are, what your circumstances are, or how low you have gone, there is hope, and you can have your life back.

 

FDA Approves Addiction Implant to Prevent Relapse

Addiction Implant Approved by FDAIn the middle of all of the American heroin epidemic comes news that the FDA has approved an addiction implant said to help prevent relapse. The implant was approved on Thursday as an innovative option for people struggling with heroin and opioid addiction. The implant slowly releases drugs into the addicts system designed to curb craving and withdrawal symptoms for six months at a time.

New Way To Administer A Known Medication

The addiction implant is called Probuphine and is the first of its kind. There are medications out there that are designed to reduce craving and withdrawal symptoms, but the implant is an innovation. The implant contains a long-used drug, buprenorphine, which has been used for years to curb cravings and withdrawal. The benefit of an implant is that there is less of a chance for doses to be skipped, therefore reducing the chance of relapsing as a result of a missed dose.

Opioid Addiction is Rampant

Opioid Addiction implantIt is estimated that more than 2.5 million Americans are addicted to opioids. The widespread use of opioids is attributed to doctors prescribing painkillers to patients which can, unfortunately, be devastatingly addicting.  Overdoses from these drugs are becoming commonplace and are responsible for tens of thousands of death per year – a number that is on the rise.

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About the Addiction Implant

The implant is the size of a matchstick and would normally be implanted in the upper arm in an outpatient setting, and removed the same way at the end of 6 months. It is thought that the implant will prevent people from skipping doses and therefore reduce the chance of relapse. The implant will work by slowly releasing a low dose of buprenorphine over a period of six months in a steady stream, preventing ups-and-downs and fluctuations in the patient.

In 2012, the FDA rejected Probuphine, citing that the dose was too small and unlikely to help addicts in recovery. This time around, additional evidence and data were submitted, and in addition, it received positive enforcement from federal advisers earlier this year.

The addiction implant is intended to be part of addiction treatment, not the whole thing. Meaning, it should be coupled with therapy and other methods to help keep an addict away from drugs and relapse.

There is no doubt that something needs to be done to curb the opioid epidemic in America, and this is a step in the right direction. As more doctors and clinics get on-board with the idea of an implant, the more addicts can be saved from relapse and go on to live healthy lives.

Drug Addiction Can Affect Anyone

Ex-NBA Player Talks About His Drug Addiction

Drug Addiction LighthouseEx-Boston Celtics player Chris Herren recently spoke to an audience at The John Carroll School in Bel Air, Maryland about his personal struggle with drug addiction and his recovery. He brought to light the fact that anyone can fall victim to addiction, even the most prominent and promising young athletes who seem to have it all together.

Herren was, at one point, his town’s biggest basketball star, who dreamed of going to the NBA – a goal he did achieve. However, like so many addicts, while he was rising in stardom, he was also dropping to rock bottom personally. Ultimately, he ended up driving his basketball career into the ground by becoming addicted to a variety of drugs including alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and painkillers.

Drug Addiction and Success Coexists, Temporarily

To an outsider, it might seem difficult to understand how a professional athlete can be the same person who crashes into a utility pole after overdosing on heroin and being legally dead for almost a minute. To people in and around addiction, the story is way too familiar. As a matter of fact, addicts are often over-achieving people who seem to get success with ease and love to climb their way to the top. Some argue that the passion and overzealous tendencies are what drive them to become such hardcore drug addicts.

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To the addict and their family, this intensity is crushing. Things can be going great and to everyone looking in seem at ease and successful. The addict uses this positivity as another reason to get high because it is a vicious cycle where the addict starts believing they won’t have the same level of success if they are sober.

Drug Addiction Encompasses Everyonedrug addiction lighthouse recovery

It is so important for parents and families to know about addiction because the truth is that everyone is at risk. Even the most prominent and promising students can fall victim, and it definitely doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with parenting skills, etc. Also – it is important not to immediately blame a children’s friends but instead to find out why your child is seeking drugs or alcohol in the first place.

It is also very important to talk to kids especially as they reach their high school years so that they know the dangers and know how devastating addiction could be to their entire future. Using stories like Herran’s is helpful because it shows a real-life example of someone that kids look up to falling to his knees.

There is Hope for Recovery

The positive message in Herran’s story is that recovery can be accomplished. He is currently going on eight years clean, and while he admits it is a daily struggle, there is nothing more rewarding to him. On sobriety and missing basketball, he says “The way I look at it, every single day I have to play in the biggest game of my life, and the reality is, I can’t lose this game. If I love one game, I might never come back.

 

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