Tag: heroin addiction

Why You Shouldn’t Go To An Opiate Rehab in New Jersey.

Opiate Rehab New Jersey? No, its time for a change.

You used opiates in New Jersey, does that mean you can’t stay sober in New Jersey… No. I will tell you though that it is much, much easier to get and stay sober in a place your body and mind isn’t already associating with Opiates. Going to an opiate rehab in New Jersey and returning to New jersey after your treatment is a recipe for disaster. This is not because New Jersey is a bad place. It is because the opiate rehab is in New Jersey.

That you want to go to is also in the same state you got high in. This is going to cause so so so so so many problems for you body mind and soul.

Opiate Rehab in New Jersey Will Not Work.

Changing people, places and things is the first thing any opiate addict is told to do when entering an opiate rehab in New Jersey or heroin detox in New Jersey. So my question to these institution of recovery in New Jersey is, why do you take people from your home state? “Triggers, not drugs are shown to be longest lasting relapse risk” as told by Psychology Today. The places you used to cop heroin will make you want to shoot up. Seeing your old heroin using friends and dealers will make you want to use. The body and mind latch on to these familiar sights, sounds and smells of opiate addiction and use them against your recovery. Attending an opiate rehab in New Jersey is not going to yield a successful recovery. Going to an opiate rehab in Florida will.

Heroin Rehab in Florida Will Work

Heroin and opiate addicts from all over the country have being moving to Florida in droves of the last 10 years. Instead of checking in to an opiate rehab in New Jersey or a heroin detox in New Jersey, opiate addicts are finding new life in the sunshine state. Opiate rehab in Florida has proven to work for people coming from outside Florida because for many it is drastically different than their home state and Florida has more people in recovery from heroin and opiates than any other state in the country. Many of these addicts in Florida have already tried the opiate rehab in New Jersey and the heroin detox in New Jersey. The results did not come because no attention was paid to the external factors that doctors have been warning us about since the 1940’s.

Push the reset button on your addiction.

Can you back to New Jersey? Yes! You! Can! I just think and so do the doctors that starting your new life will be much easier in your forgo the opiate rehab in New Jersey and start fresh. Begin that life miles away from the old places and people that scientist say will be lodged in your brain for years. You can always go back home once you have some time under your belt. You can always visit, but you need to give your heart and your mind a break. Get to Florida, start over. You’ll be glad you did and you’ll be surprised to find that most of New Jersey’s former addicts are already there.

What’s The Best Heroin Rehab Near Me?

Is There A Good Heroin Rehab Near Me

It’s not something I thought I would ever have to type into the google search in my computer, but I did. What’s the best heroin rehab near me. I have been sober for over 6 years and never tried heroin. So how did a guy like me end up on the business end of a search for heroin rehab near me? I was hanging out with the wrong girl. Tiffany Powers was her name and no that’s not her real name. Anonymity people!

It Was Clear A Heroin Detox Was Needed As well.

Tiffany and I were buds, I wanted to date her, but that friend zone seemed to exist even though I just googled heroin rehab near me, for her. You’d think after an intimate search like that love would be in the air. We were hanging out and I knew something was up. She seemed to fall asleep very quickly and was always in the bathroom for long periods of time. When I finally confronted her she said, “I’m a heroin addict, I need you to find a heroin rehab near me.” I was scared. I knew I had to act quick based on another article I wrote about what to do if some one you know needs help with addiction. I typed in heroin rehab near me when I realized, detox must come first.

Going to a Heroin Rehab Near Me Effective Without Detox?

I knew from previous experience with friends that detox from heroin was horribly painful and that I needed to find a heroin rehab near me that had a medical detox program or a heroin rehab near me that partnered with a medical detox. Unfortunately, in Broome County, NY there were no medical heroin detox facilities at the time. Not having a rehab that offered heroin detox using medication was a huge problem because I knew that many heroin addicts will leave treatment and use heroin again if they don’t have a medical heroin detox.

Tiffany’s Heroin Recovery Would Happen In Florida

It turned out that there was no heroin rehab near me and no heroin detox available for my friend. So I reached out to the place that I knew would help, Light House Recovery Institute. They got Tiffany on a plane that same day and into a heroin detox and into their recovery for heroin program. So, it turned out there actually wasn’t a rehab near me, but the good news is that with just one phone call I got her the help she needed and today things are going just great. Heroin rehab near me is something I hope no one has to ever search for. But today with technology and transportation the whole world has opened up and the help that heroin addicts need can be accessed anytime from anywhere.

Destroyed By Addiction. Saved By A Delray Beach Rehab.

Going to a Delray Beach Rehab Saved My Ldelray beach rehab lighthouseife

Eight months ago, I was homeless, unemployed, and soulless, all because I was completely and totally dependent on heroin. I know I definitely had zero intention of going to a Delray Beach Rehab. I literally slept under bridges and on park benches. I was a shell of the person I used to be, nodding out from too much heroin when I managed to score some, or running around the worst parts of town like a zombie in need of blood from The Walking Dead when I was looking for more of my drug. It was my lifeline. I was so in over my head that everyone had given up on me because the pain of watching me go downhill was too much for them. They knew there was nothing left they could do.

My Darkest Days As A Heroin Addict

I didn’t think about going to rehab. I didn’t care to. My life was what was right in front of me: the endless pursuit of my next hit. I didn’t give a damn about anything else. It’s hard to put into words what that kind of life is like. You are no longer a part of society, it’s almost as if you are one of the feral cats roaming the streets. Not a cute kitten, but one that looks like it has been in daily fights for years and most likely has rabies. That was me.

heroin addiction lighthouse recoveryI was living this way for a little over a year. How I survived I’ll never know. I got picked up by the cops one spring morning as I was hanging out with my dope dealer, up to no good in a seedy hotel room. I would have once through that room was disgusting, but in my current state at the time it was a luxury. The cops stormed in, it wasn’t the first time I had a gun pointed at my face, and I was taken away in handcuffs.

My sentence included rehab. I thought it was a joke, but I agreed to go so that some of my legal problems would go away. Off I went to a South Florida, with my destination being a Delray Beach rehab center.

My First Week at The Delray Beach Rehab

When I got to admissions, I was 105 pounds, which was entirely too little for my 5’5, naturally curvy frame. They drug tested me, asked me a million questions, and the detox process started. The next few days were horrible, hot, painful, stomach churning, sad, horrifying, and shameful. It took about 5 full days for me to feel somewhat human and to begin participating in groups, meeting with my therapist, and eating substantial meals.

When I was with it enough to speak with my therapist one on one, we actually called my parents and brother, who knew where I was but had been so estranged that we hadn’t talked to or seen each other in nearly a year. We all cried. They agreed to come in and visit me over the course of my stay.

By the end of my first week at rehab, I had come to enough to realize the severity of how I had been living my life and wished I could go back to being the cheerleading, tennis playing, peppy teenage girl I had lighthouse delray beach rehabonce been. However, I couldn’t dwell in the past if I wanted to move forward, so ahead I looked.

Learning About Myself at The Delray Recovery Center

In the rest of my time at treatment, I had the opportunity to learn more about myself than I ever knew I could. I learned the how’s and why’s of my addiction and I realized that I can actually change if I want to. Knowing that was hugely empowering, because once you break away from the addiction, you have the power to get your life back.

Sober Living in Delray

I left rehab after 60 days and continued my treatment by living in sober living in Delray beach while attending an intensive outpatient program. I did the work, and it was tough. I wanted to kill people some days, and I certainly wanted to get high. But my newfound connection with a higher power and myself helped me to stay sober, minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day.

Scars of My PaDelray Beach Rehabst and Hope for My Future

I still have scars of my addiction. I have legal problems that are still waiting to be resolved, I contracted Hepatitis C while using needles, I’m still repairing relationships with my family, and I still struggle with my addiction daily. But I’m eight months sober on the day I’m writing this, and I never thought that would be possible.

If someone as low in their life as I was can do it, anyone can. No matter who you are, what your circumstances are, or how low you have gone, there is hope, and you can have your life back.

 

Is Making Narcan Over The Counter A Good Decision?

Selling Narcan Over the Counter Narcan OVer the Counter

Naloxone (Narcan) has recently been released in limited proportions for sale over the counter in select pharmacies and states. Selling Narcan over the counter is a bold move in what many are looking at as part of the war against drugs, specifically the war against the opioid epidemic sweeping across our country. Others see it as a cop-out for junkies – a get out of jail free card in the case of an overdose. As with anything, the lines are blurry, and the bottom line is that if lives can be saved and fatal overdoses can be prevented, it is probably a good thing.

What is Narcan?

Narcan (naloxone) is an opiate antidote. Opiates include drugs like heroin, morphine, codeine, oxycodone, methadone, and Vicodin. Taking too much or a combination of any of these drugs can cause an overdose, symptoms of which include the slowing or stopping of breathing, leading to loss of consciousness and even death. Once a person who is ODing is in this state, it is incredibly difficult to wake them up.

Narcan blocks the effects of opioids and reverses an overdose in a patient that has taken too much of a drug. The opiates are essentially knocked out of receptors in the brain, even if the opiate was taken in addition to alcohol or another drug that can further suppress the immune system. After Narcan is administered, the overdosing person should begin to breathe more regularly, and they will be easier to wake. There are no known negative effects of Narcan, and nothing will happen to a person who is not ODing and accidentally takes the drug.

Narcan Over The Counter Is Controversial

Narcan over the counter LighthouseThere are many people who maintain that the only reason a person would get Narcan over the counter would be if they expected that they or someone they are close with will overdose. In their eyes, it’s a way of prepping for a big Friday night party, and as mentioned earlier in the article, a get out of jail free card.

In the eyes of supporters, Narcan is preventative. For the mothers and fathers who have an addict child, to the wives of an addict husband, and to the child of an addict mother – it is something to have around in the case of an overdose that can prevent death. It isn’t just for addicts – accidental overdose could happen to anyone who has prescription opiates on hand, so in a sense shouldn’t it be sold with every opiate prescription given out?

America’s Opiate Epidemic

It’s no secret that opiates are taking a huge toll on Americans. The U.S. is in the throes of an opiate epidemic and it is a long, sad, and messy road to get out of it. In 2014, 47,055 people died of a drug overdose, making it the number one leading cause of accidental death. It is a problem that is nationwide and is destroying lives regardless of age, race, class, and location. If Narcan can help reduce these numbers and save some lives, why wouldn’t we make it as available as possible?

I’m in Love with a Recovering Heroin Addict

I Fell In Love With a Recovering Heroin Addict Love Heroin Addict Lighthouse Recovery

We can’t choose who we fall in love with. Three years ago, I knew nothing about addiction, even though I was suffering from alcohol addiction myself, it just hadn’t been brought to light quite yet. I definitely knew nothing about heroin addiction, and would never think to associate myself with a heroin addict or anyone who was into hard drugs like that.

Him and I met through mutual friends in recovery, which is a large scene in South Florida. I remember seeing him on the beach one of the times our group got together and having an undeniable attraction to him. He apparently was in love with me the moment he first saw me – I had no idea.

We Met in Recovery in South Florida

A few months went by and we became closer, eventually going on our first date, which led to many dates, which led to us becoming a couple. His spirit matched my own and every time I looked into his eyes I felt a reflection of myself in a way I had never experienced before. We knew all about each other’s screwed up history – nothing was left in the dark between us.

Since coming to South Florida for addiction recovery, I had met my share of drug addicts, and seen relapses and ODs left and right – the first couple of times I was shocked and sad and tried to help each person, but after the 4th, 5th, 10th time – you are forced to turn a blind eye, tell the people close to you how much you love them, and hope for the best. It isn’t fun – it’s gut wrenching, heartbreaking, and my facebook feed turned into something more like an obituary of friends in recovery who lost their battle.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

He was different. The closeness we shared and still do was like nothing I had ever experienced before. So when he overdosed and nearly died, I was in shock, I was mad, I was terrified. I was lost. We had recently decided to move in together and ended up in a horrible flop house in Delray Beach. We were told by a “friend” that it was a solid halfway that we could live in as a couple while we looked for an apartment of our own.

A Halfway House Gone Bad

Love and recovery Lighthouse

The first few days were fine, but by the end of the first weekend there were fights in the middle of the night, an overdose, and we realized the houses next door to us were all huge drug dealers. We lived with a padlock on our bedroom door, and there were nights I was so scared about what was going on beyond our door that I didn’t sleep for more than a few minutes.

I knew seeing the drugs and being close to all of that was tough for him. I always knew I would be ok but my worry for him was all consuming. We moved out of that house as soon as we could, and to a friend’s house while we apartment hunted and finally found the perfect place for us and signed the lease.

 

The Heroin Overdose I didn’t Expect

I thought we were in the clear. I thought things were looking up. So when I was calling him one afternoon and didn’t hear anything from him for over an hour, I was slightly concerned because it was unusual but I wasn’t freaking out – I went back into work and figured I would hear back from him soon. I walked out of a meeting and checked my phone and had missed calls from a mutual friend, and a text that simply said, “Did you know what happened? If not call me ASAP.”

He had taken a huge dose of heroin and was found unresponsive, dead for all intents and purposes. The next hour or so was a blur, I felt every emotion in the book. I confirmed that he was breathing and alive when the ambulance took him away, but that’s all I knew. I drove to three separate hospitals looking for him, calling my best friends and screaming because I wanted to scream at him but I couldn’t reach him.

The only place I stopped was Walgreens to get cigarettes because my mind was a mess, I broke down crying and shaking to the lady at the counter who tried to get me to stay and not drive because I was such a wreck but I had to find him.

I found him at a hospital in Boca Raton. He survived. It wasn’t his time to go. I brought him home and held him all night, and he doesn’t remember a thing from that day. All he could say for himself was that it all got to be too much, seeing everyone using at the halfway, knowing I was unhappy with all the moving around we were doing, and some personal things he had going on. It was going to be his last “hoorah” before we moved into the apt the following weekend. That last hoorah almost killed him.

Living With and Loving A Recovering Heroin Addict love heroin addiction lighthouse

We moved into our apartment. Things are great, we’re both so happy. I’d love to say my fear of another overdose is gone, but it’s still very prevalent. My heart jumps into my throat every time I get a call from a number I don’t recognize, or if I don’t hear from him for an unusually long time. I have him on a short leash, and I don’t care if anyone else thinks I’m being needy or annoying, all I want is for him to live because he’s the most amazing soul I’ve ever met. I only want good things for him. 

Living with and loving a recovering heroin addict is not easy. As I said in the beginning of this article, we can’t choose the ones we love. I will not leave him, I won’t give up on him, and he’s doing well. I am grateful for every single positive moment we have together, and look forward to all the rest that we have in front of us.

 

Study Drugs and Drug Abuse in College

study drugs lighthouse recoveryStudy Drugs are Common

Experimenting, drinking, and drug abuse in college are well-known pitfalls of the four years that are meant to be spent bettering your education. Kegs, parties, marijuana – these things are normal, and often can lead to other things that spiral out of hand. The use of study drugs like Adderall and Ritalin is becoming common at school, because of the increase in energy and not needing to sleep, which students think will help them cram for exams.

Drug Abuse and Misuse

The Center on Young Adult Health and Development describes abuse and misuse of prescription drugs as any use whatsoever by someone who does not have a prescription, or if it is used by someone who has it prescribed that is not consistent with the prescribing physician’s directions.

Unfortunately, in college, lots of students with prescriptions to these drugs give them out to students who don’t. Sometimes they charge a few dollars for a pill, and sometimes they just hope it will help them get popular. Sometimes students feel pressure to sell or share their script. Either way, these pills are getting into the wrong hands and can quickly lead to abuse.

College is The Perfect Stress StormStudy Drugs college lighthouse recovery

College is a stressful time for young adults. There are so many factors – the cost of education, passing final exams, social and peer pressure, being away from home – that come together and can be overwhelming for a person. According to some doctors, anxiety has beat depression as the number one issue college students face in the nation. This anxiety about final exams can lead students to reach for any support, even if it comes in the form of a pill.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

Negative Consequences of Study Drugs

The misuse of any prescription drug is bad and could lead to very serious health consequences. It can lead to addiction, and if the prescriptions are being used while taking alcohol or other drugs, the consequences could be deadly.

Students don’t realize how potent these pills are and how they work. They don’t realize that taking them in a way that they aren’t prescribed or taking them with other things can have a slew of horrendous consequences, leading up to death.

Universities have begun trying to spread awareness about prescription drug use and abuse. Educating college kids about healthier behaviors that can help reduce stress and increase functionality.

 

Addiction Relapse After Long Sobriety

Addiction Relapse LighthouseLength of Sobriety Does Not Prevent Addiction Relapse

Addiction relapse is a part of recovery, and it doesn’t matter if you have one day sober or 30 years. In a recent interview with WNYC, popular actor Jeff Daniels, known for his roles in Dumb and Dumber and The Martian, opened up about his relapse after years of sobriety and is shedding light on an issue few people understand.

Addiction Relapse Can Happen To Anyone, Anytime

If you have been to Alcoholics or Narcotics Anonymous meetings, you have heard the phrase “Just For Today”. What that means is that just for this day we will focus on our sobriety, we will focus on staying away from our drug of choice, we will focus on our higher power and putting our best foot forward. Because, in truth, today is all we have.

An addict or alcoholic who has ten sober years is just as close to a person with one day in the sense that they both canrelapse and recovery lighthouse reach for a drink or drug at any given moment. That is why stringing together days and living in the present is the most we can do to maintain our sobriety. Looking too far in the future will be overwhelming, and celebrating lengthy sobriety to the extreme may cause our guard to go down and the walls to come crashing down.

How Common is Relapse?

In recovery, relapse happens left and right. In the first year of recovery, more than half of people will relapse. The number become more promising after that – with 66% maintaining sobriety after they hit the year mark, and it jumps to 86% after 5 or more years. That being said, relapse is circumstantial and personal, and nothing concrete can predict or prevent relapse, besides having a strong support system and the desire to stay sober.

Addiction relapse can be heartbreaking for friends and family to watch. It’s the last thing we want for those close to us, especially after seeing how far they have come. It is important to support the person and do what you can to encourage them to get help, ideally before the relapse occurs.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

How to Handle a Relapse

If you have relapsed, the important thing is not to get into a huge downward spiral because of it. This is a time to learn from your mistakes, gather yourself up, and move forward. First of all, remove yourself from any situation or people that contributed to your relapse. Make sure to get rid of any alcohol or drug paraphernalia you might have laying around, and if needed, seek a medical detox center to help you recover back into being clean.

If a loved one has relapsed, encourage them to get help before the situation escalated. As heartbreaking as it may be, try not to be terribly outwardly angry with them, because chances are they are feeling very low, and this kind of “attack” may make them use or drink even more.

We only have today. So, let go of your mistakes from yesterday, and forget about tomorrow. Focus on being sober, happy, and positive – just for today.

Rehab Centers in Florida and Recovery

Why Are There So Many Rehab Centers in Florida?

South Florida, especially Palm Beach County, has long been known as America’s treatment capital of the world. All types of treatment and recovery programs can be found here, including medical detox programs, inpatient rehab centers, sober living environments, and 12 Step meetings.

There are many reasons for the abundance of rehab centers in Florida, some of which include South Florida providing a prime location for treatment, paving way for the standard of treatment, and accumulating a large group of individuals in recovery.

Sunny Location Helps to Alleviate Depressive Episodes

The location is great. After all, sunny skies and clear beaches can lift anyone’s spirits. Seasonal Affective Disorder doesn’t exist down here, and believe it or not, seasons play a huge part in affecting a person’s mood. Episodes of depression could potentially lead to a relapse as addicts and alcoholics tend to “self-medicate” without healthier coping mechanisms. You’ll find a lot of northerners are in South Florida simply just to escape the dark and cold of winter.

Rehab Centers Follow the “Florida Model”

The treatment industry is huge in Florida. In fact, South Florida has its very own model of rehab called, appropriately, the “Florida Model.” As a result, other states recognize this and attempt to mirror the quality by offering the same types of programs and services that are typically provided in Florida.

Florida typically offers separate living quarters from where daytime activities are held so that clients feel like they are living in the real world and not necessarily in an institution.

The best drug rehab centers in Florida provide on-site support and monitoring all throughout inpatient treatment. In addition to this, these leading centers offer individual counseling, group therapy, community events, meetings, and a wide of array of treatment services.

The Drug and Alcohol Recovery Community

There’s no denying that there are plenty of drug rehab centers in Florida. No matter what type of facility you prefer, or what your drug of choice is, you are pretty much guaranteed to find something to suit your needs when seeking inpatient treatment.

As a result, there is a large recovery community of support once you leave treatment. Many people end up staying down in Florida once they complete rehab, and as a result, there are a lot of recovery-based activities and organizations.

There are two sides to a large recovery community. It’s great to have the support and so many people going through exactly what you are going through. The flip side is that with recovery can come relapse. So while recovery is big, it’s important to stay on the right path because if you slip and relapse, the current is strong and ready to suck you right back into addiction.

Treatment centers are left and right. After all, there is such a large community of people in recovery and some may need treatment again one day, especially if they just came to Florida for treatment only to relapse and are looking for a different rehab center to provide a higher level of care.

A large amount of people in recovery and many rehab centers does leave room for many job opportunities for those new in recovery. Many halfway houses require their tenants to have a job within a week or two of living at their house, and clients are forced to get out and re-integrate themselves into the real world.

Lots of employers are knowledgeable about the recovery scene, and may even be in recovery themselves, so it is great for someone fresh out of rehab to have that support.

Lighthouse Is One of the Premiere Rehab Centers in Florida

At Lighthouse, our biggest focus is getting you or your loved one better. Based in Delray Beach, which is a huge recovery hub, we take the essence of South Florida and aim to help people from all walks of life who may be struggling with addiction. Our staff is passionately dedicated to helping addicts heal and become functioning members of society. Many of our staff is in recovery as well, so we speak from the heart, as well as from experience.

Our Team Genuinely Cares About Each Patient

While there are a number of drug rehab centers in South Florida for a variety of different reasons, Lighthouse is focused on the interests of the addict and alcoholic. We truly want to help people take that first step toward a newfound life. At Lighthouse, we get the opportunity to make the difference and change people’s lives.

No Other Rehab Center in South Florida Compares

Though there are many rehab centers in South Florida to choose from, no other compares to Lighthouse. We have been providing treatment to individuals suffering from drug addiction and alcoholism for many years. Our team of professionals is equipped with the knowledge and background to help you each and every step of the way during your journey toward recovery.

Variety of Treatment Programs and Services Offered

Lighthouse understands the importance of providing step-down care, which is why our treatment programs don’t end with medical detoxification and instead extend to dual diagnosis treatment, Partial Hospitalization Programs (PHP), Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOP), medication-assisted treatment (MAT), and more. We even extend our addiction treatment services, like relapse prevention, life skills, and family therapy, to further enhance the recovery experience.

When you need a treatment center that provides the highest level of care, you can always depend on Lighthouse. We always go the extra mile to help the individual struggling with addiction because we know, from first-hand experience, how painful the pit of addiction can be. Let us help you get sober and work toward a new life in recovery today. Call Lighthouse now at 1-866-308-2090.

Methamphetamine Facts to Know

Meth Facts LighthouseGet the Methamphetamine Facts!

Methamphetamine, also known as crystal meth, is an extremely addictive stimulant that is widely abused because of the immediate, intense euphoria that it produces. Meth can be taken in a variety of ways – orally, smoked, injected, just to name a few – and is so addictive because the intense high is short and the low that users hit after using pushes them to seek more, which leads to taking repeat doses.

Methamphetamine Facts: How Does It Affect the Brain?

Methamphetamine directly affects dopamine levels in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical in the brain that functions as a neurotransmitter. It is known as the “reward molecule”, meaning that it is responsible for reward-driven behavior and pleasure seeking. Every type of reward and pleasure seeking behavior increases the level of dopamine transmission in the brain. Meaning, food, sex, good music, and other feel-good activities all affect dopamine. Unfortunately, so do super-destructive drugs like meth.

Meth releases dopamine rapidly into the brain and produces euphoria, and repeated use can easily lead to addiction, which is characterized by compulsively seeking more drugs and stopping at nothing to get them.Methamphetamine Facts

Long-term, meth can cause anxiety, confusion, insomnia, mood disturbances, and violent behavior. Psychosis can also occur, causing hallucinations and delusions. Chronic use can cause chemical changes in the brain affecting emotion and memory, something people may not regain fully even once they quit using.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

Methamphetamine Facts: How Does It Affect the Body?

Meth creates a fake sense of well-being and energy, which in turn causes users to push their bodies much harder than one normally would. The drug also decreases appetite drastically, leading to malnutrition, dangerous weight loss, and nausea. Other pitfalls of meth include but are not limited to insomnia, disturbed sleep, aggressiveness, irritability, convulsions, paranoia, all leading up to and including death.

Long-term, using meth can cause harm that cannot be reversed. Heart damage can result from the increased heart rate and blood pressure the drug causes, along with damaging blood vessels in the brain that can cause strokes. Cardiovascular collapse or death, liver, kidney, and lung damage have all been seen in long-term meth users.

Aesthetically, meth users tend to look like the walking dead. Between the malnutrition, sunken cheeks, hollowed eyes, open sores, and decaying teeth – over the course of just a year a meth user can look like they’re aged 40 years.

The methamphetamine facts are there – this drug does a ton of harm to a person, physically, mentally, socially, and emotionally. If you or someone you know is using meth, seek help immediately before any of the irreversible damage takes hold, and get your life on the right track.

 

Searching for a Way Out of America’s Opioid Epidemic

Opioid Use is RampantAmericas Opioid Epidemic

Opioid abuse has become an all-American epidemic, unique to our country and widespread enough to be called a public health outbreak. Abuse covers all ages, races, classes, and genders, however, the most typical victim is a non-Hispanic Caucasian male in his mid-30s.

In emergency rooms, nurses are not surprised when new overdose patients are rolled in on stretchers. Overdose is becoming so widely common that many doctors no longer need to run lab tests to determine which drug caused it. Observations such as dilated pupils mean cocaine, amphetamines, and hallucinogens. Constricted pupils almost always point to an opiate.

Opiate abuse also causes the characteristic “nodding out”, scratching, cold and clammy skin. In the wrong amounts, overdose is always just a few breaths away – and when that breath begins to sound like a rattle – the person is officially in the midst of an overdose that all too frequently leads to death.

The thought of a loved one – anyone – dying like this is terrifying, and reality is that every 19 minutes, one person in this country dies of opioid overdose. Hydrocodone, OxyContin, and Percocet are three examples of this medication, the only one known to man that is routinely prescribed and kills patients so frequently.

[BLUECTA title=”Addiction is not a choice!”]866-205-3108[/BLUECTA]

How Did The Opioid Epidemic Get So Bad?

The United States is embarrassingly leading the charge in opioid abuse. 75% of the world’s opioid prescription drugs are prescribed here, and it is the number one cause of preventable death. We can’t point our fingers in one direction to place blame, however, certain pharmaceutical companies and doctors certainly had a heavy hand in leading to these statistics.

The FDA was misled for years about the true nature of opioid dependence so that big pharmaceutical companies could sell more drugs and make more money. Doctors often turn a blind eye to the reality of these drugs, accepting lame scientific data and continue writing out prescriptions, ignoring the obvious red flags.

Some staggering facts include:

  • 259 million opioid prescriptions are written yearly – enough to give every American adult their own bottle of pills
  • 91% of people who survived an overdose are able to get a new prescription, often from the same doctor
  • 80% of heroin users started off using pain pills
  • As many as 4.2 million Americans have reported using heroin at least once
  • 94% of respondents in a 2014 survey of people in treatment said they chose to use heroin because prescription opioids were more expensive and difficult to obtain.
  • Heroin overdose deaths in women have tripled in the past few years.

 

Opioid AbusePutting an End to Prescription Abuse

The opioid industry has gotten so huge that it will take a long time to shift practices and make a positive change. As policy makers start to learn about the epidemic – and it can’t be ignored for much longer – they will begin to modify regulations. Small changes can already be seen, pills coming with safeguards to make them more difficult to abuse, the Centers for Disease Control recommending doctors not to prescribe opioids for chronic pain, monitoring of controlled substances, but much of the responsibility lies with each doctor.

Doctors need to discuss options and the realities of addiction with their patients and be more vigilant in what and how they are prescribing medications. Expectations must be set, and follow up is necessary. Knowing more about a patient’s history is key – for example, if a patient has a history of drug or alcohol abuse, they should never be prescribed addictive drugs. Opioids should always be considered an end-of-the-line resource instead of the first thing handed out.

Those of us in recovery are tired of hearing about friends and loved ones overdosing. We are sick of the same familiar and sad story. It isn’t too late to make a change, but in order for the severity of this to end, doctors need to step up and tighten up their prescription policies.

 

We are here to support you during your time of need and help you make the best decision for yourself or your loved one. Click below to speak to a member of our staff directly.

Menu